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Why Are Private Schools So Expensive? (Top 10 Reasons)

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Private schools are expensive to operate.

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Parents and guardians who enroll their children in them willingly pay the high price required for this alternative to public schools.

Despite the costs associated with private schools, many parents consider them an investment in their children’s future success.

To them, expensive tuition today offers their kids personal fulfillment and opportunities that will open doors tomorrow.

Here are 10 reasons that private schools are so expensive.

 

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Why Are Private Schools So Expensive? (Top 10 Reasons)

 

1. Funding Source And Pedigree

Man teacher with Students In Science Class

 

Public schools get funding from public sources.

In some locations, taxpayers see public schools as a luxury that should receive bare-bones funding.

By contrast, private schools derive much of their funding from high tuition payments, donations, endowments, investment returns, and philanthropy from their alumni.

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Their primary sources of financial support offer a defining distinction between public and private schools.

Fundraising and “prospect cultivation”—seeking donors—are important responsibilities of private school administrators and trustees.

Some private schools do receive public funds if they operate as charter schools, and a few operate on former public school campuses in states where lawmakers focus on privatization initiatives in education.

Exclusive private schools may focus on “pedigree” by offering legacy admissions to the children of alumni or deep-pocketed donors.

Similar to the way some companies market their high-end products as superior to the generic alternative, private schools emphasize the value of their pedigree in their marketing materials.

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Private schools tout graduates who have landed successful careers and high-paying jobs to prove their value.

Their elite or exclusive character attracts great interest among parents with resources who want the best for their kids.

 

2. Smaller Class Size

Pupils In Computer Class With Teacher

 

A lower student-to-teacher ratio is found in private schools.

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To many parents and guardians, class size matters.

They willingly pay high tuition for their children to get greater access to teachers and more individualized instruction.

In 2016–2017, the average private elementary classroom had 16.7 students, while public elementary classrooms averaged 20.9 students.

The difference in student-to-teacher ratio becomes more pronounced in general education classes than in specialized electives.

In public schools, general and remedial courses have crowded classrooms.

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Higher-level foreign language classes and other electives in public schools may have fewer students, but these course sections are often the first to be placed on the budgetary chopping block.

By comparison, private schools understand that specialized classes with fewer students in them attract parents concerned about their children’s education.

Parents with financial means are willing to pay for lower class sizes and better access to high-quality teachers.

 

3. Greater Investment in Infrastructure

Building on a college campus in Indiana

 

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Private schools invest in the best infrastructure and equipment possible.

Parents want their kids to take classes in clean, well-equipped, and well-maintained facilities.

Fancy computer and science labs, well-stocked libraries, and comfortable state-of-the-art gyms and swimming pools attract their interest.

Except in places where public entities fund charter schools, most of the cost for these enhanced resources must come from expensive tuition charges that parents and guardians pay.

Private schools usually own the land and buildings where the campus operates, and are fully responsible for their upkeep.

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As buildings age and new equipment become necessary, private schools must pay for these things.

Private schools must hire a sufficient number of staff members to keep the campus tidy and inviting.

Parents paying for expensive private schools do not want their children attending dirty schools or using filthy facilities.

Students in private schools may have messy lockers, but the overall campus is clean and welcoming.

 

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4. Higher Instructional Costs

Teacher at work

 

Private schools tend to invest more funds in paying for teacher salaries than their public school counterparts.

In elite private schools, this means teachers may have more take-home pay for their work.

Private schools often justify increased salaries for these teachers due to their extensive teaching experience and advanced degrees.

Many teachers on exclusive private school campuses have master’s or doctorate degrees in their field of study.

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Some of these teachers may also serve as part-time, adjunct faculty at nearby colleges or universities.

These connections open additional doors for the secondary students these educators teach in the private school.

Private schools may offer incentives for their teachers to take additional graduate-level courses in their fields.

On residential campuses, these educators may also have access to free or low-cost meals and accommodations.

 

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Teacher Salaries

Headteachers and senior educators often command high salaries.

Not all private school teachers get paid better than their public school counterparts, however.

Some Catholic schools have nuns and other educators who receive much lower pay.

Even in private schools with higher instructional costs, the average teacher’s pay might be less.

This could occur because younger teachers attracted to private schools earn less than long-time teachers at public schools.

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This also reflects the reality that maintaining smaller class sizes requires a private school to hire more teachers per pupil.

While some private school teachers enjoy a handsome array of benefits, they may get less than their public school peers.

As public employees, public school teachers often have guaranteed pensions or other job protections negotiated through a union or collective bargaining process.

Public school teachers tend to have greater job security.

While a private school teacher may serve as an at-will employee, public school teachers may be able to call upon their union if they face demotion, retaliation, termination, or other sanctions.

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Moving from the classroom to the principal’s office, private schools also have higher administrative costs.

The principal or headmaster, as well as other senior administrators, tend to be highly-regarded professionals.

Higher fees and fundraising initiatives attract a high caliber of leaders.

They may have personal vehicles, and even a private residence funded in part by the trustees at their disposal.

The Peter Principle happens less frequently in determining who sits in the principal’s office of the private school.

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5. Flexible Curriculum

Male High School Teacher Sitting At Tabl

 

Private schools have more flexibility in tailoring their curriculum.

Parents also have more input into the curriculum at many private schools.

One important reason parents pay high tuition to private schools is the quality of the curriculum.

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Although these institutions must meet certain standards issued by the state and accrediting bodies, private schools have more latitude when developing course requirements and graduation standards.

Public schools have to meet state requirements, too, but they have far less freedom to experiment.

Legislators and school board members frequently inject themselves into discussions about the curriculum offered in public schools, sometimes to the detriment of the students.

Private schools operating under the authority of religious bodies usually offer courses in religious education.

Nearly 80% of private school students attend a campus with some level of religious affiliation.

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Almost two million students attend Catholic schools, though more than 18% of them have other religious affiliations at home.

Even if they have a prescribed religious focus, private schools, in general, have greater flexibility to introduce a traditional liberal arts education to their students.

Younger students at Montessori schools have opportunities for self-directed study that differ greatly from a student forced to study on their own due to overcrowded classrooms in underfunded public schools.

Field trips, visiting speakers, and increased opportunities for hands-on learning are often part of the private school curriculum.

Art and music experiences rarely offered in public schools are often among the private school course offerings.

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At the secondary level, private schools have advanced courses that prepare students for a transition into a college or university.

The average private school offers 11 Advanced Placement courses, compared with an average of eight for all secondary schools.

Some religious private schools may include a curricular component that requires “missions” to the outside world.

Many private schools incorporate public service or community outreach into the curriculum.

The difference between the curricula in private and public schools has become more obvious in recent years.

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Many states have called for a back-to-basics education in public schools that emphasizes mandated tests and core curricula and allows for fewer electives.

Electives now offered in public schools tend to focus more on practical skills than on intellectual pursuits.

 

6. Extra Academic Resources

Teacher and her pupil are writing together

 

In addition to smaller class sizes, private schools often provide additional academic support not found in public schools.

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Tutors and other instructional support staff provide a lot of assistance to the classroom teachers.

Tutoring services may include basic assistance for students with learning disabilities and special needs.

Paraprofessionals, teacher assistants, and tutors may also offer a wide range of focused workshops to prepare students for college prep, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate programs.

Some of these support services are similar to those found in public schools, such as guidance counselors, but often with better resources.

Guidance counselors and advisors in private schools prepare college-bound kids for the next level.

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Even if a student prefers a vocational track instead of the university experience, counselors have more resources to steer their students in the best direction.

Other support staff may teach piano or other instruments or offer foreign language immersion.

Private schools may also offer elite and individualized sports not found in public schools, such as polo or fencing.

Larger private schools also field traditional sports teams for kids, such as basketball, football, and softball.

Parents may prefer an expensive private school because when it comes to tutoring and helping their kids, the “school takes care of it.”

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These extra resources cost a pretty penny that many public schools lack.

 

7. Extracurricular Experiences

Singing In Music Lesson

 

In addition to extra academic resources, private schools also provide extracurricular resources that expand experiences outside of the classroom.

Clubs and student organizations exist at most schools, but private schools have more resources for them.

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The adage, “you get what you pay for,” often applies to the expensive extracurricular experiences some of these schools have available.

Many private schools offer cultural heritage journeys to museums, concerts, and other performances.

Private schools budget a lot of money to offer expensive field trips, language and music lessons, and other out-of-class activities.

These trips and social experiences round out the already-impressive in-class curriculum.

Many of these extracurricular experiences build character and leadership.

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Other activities promote personal growth, as well as sportsmanship and broader social awareness.

The extra fees required for these experiences may become quite costly.

Their price, however, gives a much greater return for students who gain real-world experiences that no single textbook can provide.

 

8. More Expensive Supplies

Teenage Students Wearing Uniform Studying In IT Class

 

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Unlike public schools which are often strapped for resources, private school tuition allows for the purchase of adequate supplies.

Many public school teachers dig into their pockets to buy pencils, pens, and paper.

Some public school teachers hold fundraisers or even sell doughnuts to raise money for school supplies.

Most private schools have sufficient resources to make sure students have basic needs met.

Beyond that, the students’ families tend to have better access to funds.

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In addition to giving their children school supplies, many private schools require parents to purchase uniforms for their kids.

Children attending private schools rarely show up in class without the basic tools they need.

Beyond the basics, private schools also invest in better gadgets, computers, and scientific supplies, such as microscopes.

Public school students might have to use test tubes older than they are.

They may sit at the same desks that their parents used a generation earlier.

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Conversely, private school students get newer equipment, if these items will further their educational interests in the classroom.

To meet the expectations of parents, private schools must invest in quality materials rather than cheap alternatives.

Expensive supplies go beyond what is in the physical plant, to include resources such as access to digital access and other subscription-based content.

Private school administrators often supplement their libraries by entering into partnerships with local public libraries.

Some private high schools even arrange for their students to have library privileges at nearby colleges.

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9. Security Costs

Cropped view of guard in uniform talking

 

Parents in some parts of the country select private schools for reasons other than the curriculum.

If they live in an area where public schools have suffered low funding and decline for many years, the private schools that exist in the community may be the only safe alternatives for them to select.

Although rarely mentioned directly, one selling point of private schools is the sense of security they offer.

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Parents paying out of pocket expect a safe environment for their children.

Whether in the inner city or a suburban area, private schools hire security guards.

Security guards and other protective measures found in private schools come with a cost.

While public schools may also have security guards, many public school campuses rely on the already-overworked local police or sheriff’s deputies.

Attacks on students, teachers, and administrators happen at much lower rates in private schools.

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In private schools that mandate uniforms, it is easier to determine if an outsider has entered the campus.

In areas where gang activity is more common, gangs are more likely to appear on public school campuses than at nearby private schools.

Due to enhanced security and greater parental involvement, private schools see less hate-related graffiti.

Although bullying is a universal problem in all schools, it tends to occur at a lower rate in private schools.

Although theft and vandalism happen in all schools, additional security resources make it less likely to happen in private schools.

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Beyond the paid security staff, another type of investment in security oversight often occurs in private schools.

Since parents and guardians pay high tuition to private schools, they get more involved in the day-to-day oversight of those institutions.

Parent-teacher groups and parent oversight boards make campus safety a high priority.

If incidents occur, parents demand answers and, if necessary, dig deeper into their pockets to fund additional resources.

 

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10. Varieties Of Choice

Teenage Students Listening To Teacher In Art Class

 

The most important thing to consider when knowing that private schools are so expensive is that a variety of private schools exist.

When looking at the full span of private education, in 2021 dollars, the cost of private education from kindergarten through a four-year degree averages over $290,000.

This estimate does not represent more exclusive schools that have residential programs or boarding costs.

Some private schools have tuition and other costs that are more expensive than other schools.

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The average tuition at private schools throughout the United States in 2021 dollars was $12,350.

Tuition rises at the high school level, reaching $16,040 per year.

The top 260 boarding schools have an average annual cost of $37,590, including room and board.

By comparison, the average tuition at the nation’s 5158 Catholic elementary schools is much lower, only $4,840 per year.

With such wide variations in tuition, parents seeking a private school education should shop around and compare what various educational institutions will offer their children as they continue their academic journey.

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What Are The Choices?

When considering private schools, parents should understand their differences in cost as well as their educational approach in the curriculum, extracurricular activities, and resources available to students and the instructional staff.

Below are some considerations that will affect how expensive a private school may be for students.

 

A. For-Profit Or Nonprofit

While all private schools charge fees, for-profit schools are in the business of making money for investors.

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Nonprofit schools, often run by private foundations or religious entities, tend to have lower fees than for-profit ones.

 

B. Faith-Based

The majority of private schools—approximately two-thirds of them—have a religious focus.

These schools attract more than three-fourths of the students who enroll in private schools.

There is diversity within religious schools.

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Some religious schools get funding from tuition fees but operate independently from a church or other religious house of worship.

Other religious schools exist as parish or parochial schools that act as an extension of the religious institution that manages their activities.

Parochial schools tend to charge lower tuition and fees than other private religious schools.

 

C. Boarding Schools

In addition to private schools where students take classes and return home at the end of the day, boarding schools offer a different alternative.

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Boarding schools provide lodging, meals, and a more supervised and controlled environment where students live away from their homes.

Some boarding school students who live on campus during weekdays may head home on the weekends.

Faculty and staff who work at boarding schools either live on campus or in the immediate community surrounding the institution.

 

D. Specific Field of Study

Some specialty schools also exist.

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They may offer intense instruction and boarding opportunities for students pursuing a specific instructional interest, such as language immersion, tennis playing, or theatrical or musical performances.

 

E. Special Education

Other private schools may provide educational opportunities for students on the autism spectrum, as well as those with disabilities or learning disorders.

Teachers at these specialized private schools have training and experience appropriate for the needs of the students enrolled at these locations.

Tuition and fees at specialized schools reflect the costs associated with the intense levels of instruction, supervision, and support necessary to ensure student success.

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The post Why Are Private Schools So Expensive? (Top 10 Reasons) appeared first on The Cold Wire.



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NFL 2022: McCaffrey, Young, Ramsey among key players returning from injuries

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Christian McCaffrey and Chase Young are among NFL stars returning from injuries. Dr. Matt Provencher breaks down what to expect.



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Why Kevin Durant’s ultimatum to the Nets requires just a one-word response from owner Joe Tsai

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Give Kevin Durant this much credit: The man isn’t afraid to go to the mattresses.

But let’s let the praise, awe or understanding end there. Durant’s move this week to reportedly sit with Brooklyn Nets owner Joe Tsai and lay down a me-or-them ultimatum is the latest proof that the only thing Durant may excel at more than basketball is an uncanny knack for turning tone deafness into an art form.

He’s a diva-may-care. And Tsai has to tell the man the same word Nets general manager Sean Marks did, as we suggested here when news of Durant’s trade demand first surfaced, the word that has led to all this huffing and puffing to blow Tsai’s team down: No.

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No, Kevin, you’re not in charge.

No, Kevin, we won’t blow up our team, or trade you, or — cue Durant’s latest would-be power play — fire all the adults in the room because they didn’t treat your tantrum like the world’s most sagacious reaction to difficulty. 

Let’s hone in on why, in London, Durant reportedly told the Nets owner he must either trade him — or fire head coach Steve Nash and Marks.

It’s not, as Shams Charania reported for The Athletic, because Durant is “transparent and professional,” the description of the supposed mood of the high-powered confab. This is all happening, including the timing and tone of this news story, because Durant has too often made a habit of being neither transparent nor professional.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to read this piece from Charania, a world-class NBA newsbreaker who himself has been transparent at times about his willingness to carry water for the sources who allow him to offer such accurate and valuable information, and deduce that Durant or those near him leaked the reporting in exchange for casting all this in a favorable light.

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Thus, KD’s latest me-me-me-me move gets sold as an above-the-board powerbroker handling such difficulties with aplomb and maturity. Don’t buy it for a second.

Strip away the quid-pro-quo that is the heartbeat of breaking sports news, and “does not have faith in the team’s direction” actually translates to: Didn’t do my bidding.

As in: Durant demanded a trade, Marks said no, and the superstar, unaccustomed to that word, has responded with a next-level move. The choice now that it’s either him or them. Despite the details that, you know, exactly one year before the Tasi meeting, Durant signed a four-year, $198 million contract extension.

Durant isn’t just saying keep me or keep them. He’s saying, regardless of how newsbreakers try to present his latest diva-demand, either trade him — or make him the boss.

Look, Durant is a basketball player of otherworldly talent and dedication. His talent borders on the miraculous, and his love for the game is clear. He is also, when not going full diva, by all accounts a great guy. Human beings are complicated, and we can be many things at once: Talented, dedicated, hungry, kind, interesting, insightful, and full of petty grievances and insecurities. 

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None of this is to say Durant is a bad person, as if that has any place in a sports column. It’s to say that many all-time great players are remarkably awful string-pullers and would-be GMs. Look westward, Tsai, to the Los Angeles Lakers and one LeBron James for a real-world, real-time reminder.

Trade Durant (for the right price), or don’t. Believe in him, or decide you’ve had enough. But don’t allow Durant to burn everything down because last year was tough. Don’t let him hold you hostage because he didn’t get his way in demanding a trade that would devastate the Nets without a fair return. Don’t let him end the run of Marks, who has proven himself a great general manager, nor that of a Hall of Fame player in Nash who deserves more time to show what he can or can’t do as a head coach.

This is scorched-earth stuff. Things went bad, let me leave. You won’t just give me away, fire everyone. You won’t fire everyone, fine, time for the public-news-bomb-pressure campaign. 

That’s the other part of this.

It’s beyond credulity to entertain the idea that Tsai or those around him leaked this news. There’s no need. The Nets owner doesn’t need to leverage himself by leaking a blockbuster bit of news in order to pressure himself. He’s the decision maker. So if this report from Shams came from Durant and the people around him — as seems quite clear, especially given the rosy presentation of Durant’s end of things — then KD went in 24 hours, straight from asking Tasi to fire Nash and Marks, to trying to publicly pressure Tasi to do it.

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That’s a tantrum. Or hardball. Or both. But either way, it’s bad business, and there remains one word in response, either to trading a generational talent like KD for less than what you want in return, or in firing the GM who won’t do so, along with his hand-picked head coach:

No. 

No, Kevin.

No.

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Players to watch on each team at 2022 World Junior Hockey Championship – Sportsnet.ca

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The summer version of the 2022 World Junior Hockey Championship has arrived in Edmonton.

The feeling around the tournament is mixed but the competing players take pride in representing their county when given the opportunity. For some of the participants, this will be their only chance to face some of the best players from top-ranked countries around the world.

Here are some notes on players to watch on each of the 10 teams in the tournament.

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Group A

Team USA

Logan Cooley

Forward | Left shot | Five-foot-10 | 181 pounds | Arizona Coyotes (first round, third overall in 2022)

He was in the discussion for No. 1 overall at this past draft and landed in Arizona at No. 3. He has an opportunity to show off his skill at this event, especially without players like Juraj Slafkovsky and Shane Wright in attendance. Cooley is an elite play driver who simply creates offence and can take over a game. He’s worth the price of admission.


Charlie Stramel

Forward | Right shot | Six-foot-three | 216 pounds | 2023 NHL Draft eligible

There should be an opportunity for Stramel to find a role with Team USA on the wing. He can also play center so it will come down to a coach’s decision and team need. The big-body forward plays a power game. He isn’t exceptionally fast in open ice but he has decent mitts and creates space in traffic. Stramel is a power forward who is a late 2004 birthday which makes him eligible for the 2023 NHL Draft. He is committed to attending Wisconsin.

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Matthew Knies

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-three | 205 pounds | Toronto Maple Leafs (second round, 57th overall in 2021)

Power forward who can extend plays, isn’t shy about getting pucks to the net, battles for space around the crease, and cleans up rebounds. Team USA has some smaller skilled centerman on their roster and he opens up space for that style of player. Knies is heading back to Minnesota in the NCAA this fall.


Brock Faber

Defenceman | Right shot | Six-foot | 190 pounds | Minnesota Wild via L.A. Kings (second round, 45th overall in 2020)

Originally selected by the Los Angeles Kings, Faber was a key piece of the Kevin Fiala trade this summer with Fiala ending up in California. This kid is a pro. He’s a leader who plays the game the right way. Faber provides exceptional three-zone detail. He’s likely to be the captain for Team USA. He will be deployed in all situations but his offence is secondary to the rest of his game.

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Team Sweden

Jesper Wallstedt

Goalie | Catches left | Six-foot-three | 214 pounds | Minnesota Wild (first round, 20th overall in 2021)

Wallstedt is coming over to play in the Minnesota Wild organization this season at the AHL level in Iowa. It won’t be long before he challenges for an NHL job. He gives the Swedes an opportunity to win. He’s big in the net and plays with poise between the posts. His stats at the SHL level (Sweden’s top league) playing for Lulea last season: 22 games played with a 1.98 goals-against average and .918 save percentage.

Jonathan Lekkerimaki

Forward | Right shot | Five-foot-11 | 172 pounds | Vancouver Canucks (first round, 15th overall in 2022)

It will be interesting to see if Lekkerimaki can establish himself at this tournament and play to his identity. He’s an elite shooter. His element is offence. His off-the-puck detail and willingness in the hard areas will need to elevate but if he’s scoring the Swedes will be pleased.

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Daniel Torgersson

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-three | 205 pounds | Winnipeg Jets (second round, 40th round pick in 2020)

Torgersson is a power forward who moves well for his stature. He is best suited at the net front extending plays or looking for tips and rebounds. He isn’t a threat off the rush but he does have the ability to extend plays along the boards. This is the kind of player that can open up space for skilled linemates. It will be interesting to see how he is deployed.

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Team Germany

Luca Hauf

Forward | Left shot | Five-foot 11 | 183 pounds | Edmonton Oil Kings (WHL)

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Hauf is scheduled to join Edmonton in the WHL this season so he will be familiarizing himself with the surroundings at this tournament. He has a nose for the net and will find pucks around the crease. On occasion he distributes and finds open space off the rush. It will be interesting to see how he competes with the pace of play at this event.

Maksymilian Szuber

Defenceman | Left shot | Six-foot-three | 190 pounds | Arizona Coyotes (sixth round, 163rd overall in 2022)

A big body defender who is developing in the DEL playing for EHC Munchen. Szuber is mostly a stay-at-home defender but he will occasionally pinch down to keep pucks alive in the offensive zone. Defensively he is rangy and uses his long reach to his advantage. Szuber will skate at even strength and on the penalty kill for the Germans.

Nikita Quapp

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Goalie | Catches left | Six-foot-three | 187 pounds | Carolina Hurricanes (sixth round, 187th overall in 2021)

Quapp is a true butterfly/hybrid goalie. He plays down on the ice. When he is on his game he can swallow pucks from distance and limits his rebounds. When teams get him moving side to side to make second stops (or desperation saves) he has lacked lateral quickness to recover. If he’s the starter for Team Germany they will need him to be on top of his game. Quapp is signed to play for Eisbaren Berlin in the DEL next season.

Team Switzerland

Brian Zanetti

Defenceman | Left shot | Six-foot-two | 181 pounds | Philadelphia Flyers (fourth round, 110th pick in 2021)

Zanetti has some interesting qualities. He moves pretty well. He has a long reach. He can take away space. Zanetti has also shown an ability to provide some secondary scoring. He is likely to be used in all situations for Team Switzerland. It has taken time for Zanetti to add strength to his lanky frame. The Swiss will need all of their defenders to play an engaged game at this tournament.

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Simon Knak

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-one | 185 pounds | Nashville Predators (sixth round, 179th pick in 2021)

Knak plied his trade in the WHL with the Portland Winterhawks before the pandemic. He showed he can contribute offensively while providing decent three-zone detail. He is playing for HC Davos in Switzerland and on occasion shows some streaky offence. The fact he is willing to get in on the forecheck and bump opponents to extend plays is an element that should land him in the top six for Team Switzerland.

Kevin Pasche

Goalie | Catches right | Five-foot-10 | 187 pounds | Omaha Lancers (USHL)

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Pasche had a solid year in Omaha posting a winning record and save percentage over .900.
It’s not clear who will have the net for the Swiss but Pasche has proven he can elevate for stretches and give his team a chance to win. The fact that he’s a southpaw gives shooters a different look. If he does play games his crease composure and rebound control will have to be spot on against top-flight opponents since he lacks the size to be giving up too many second chances against.

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Team Austria

Recently drafted Marco Kasper would have been, by far, the most talented player on this team but elected to take time off before attending his first NHL training camp in Detroit next month. Kasper was selected eighth overall by the Red Wings in Montreal.

Beyond Kasper there are too many unknowns to handicap the Austrian roster. The team hasn’t won a game at their last five world junior championships (0-17). I’m sure there will be some motivated players suiting up for Austria. Time will tell who catches my eye.

Group B

Team Canada

Connor Bedard

Forward | Right shot | Five-foot-nine | 181 pounds | Regina Pats (WHL) | 2023 NHL Draft eligible

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This is the jumping-off point for what should be an exciting journey towards the 2023 NHL Draft for Bedard. He’s a dynamic talent who scored 51 goals and 49 assists for 100 points last season in Regina before adding six goals and seven points at the U18 Worlds. It will be impossible for him to shed the spotlight from now until next June. Team Canada is counting on his element to contribute to their success at the tournament.


Mason McTavish

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-one | 207 pounds | Anaheim Ducks (first round, third overall in 2021)

Nobody has played more hockey in more countries than McTavish in the past 12 months, with stops in Anaheim (NHL), San Diego (AHL), Peterborough (OHL), Team Canada (Olympics), and Hamilton (OHL). He has answered the bell at every stop. McTavish plays his best when the games get harder. He scored 16 goals and 29 points the playoffs for Hamilton, helping them win the OHL title. He gives opponents all they can handle in the trenches. Team Canada will be counting on his power, skill and leadership as captain.

Ridly Greig

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot | 174 pounds | Ottawa Senators (first round, 28th overall in 2020)

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In order to have success at an event like this it takes more than finesse and skill. It also takes grit and determination. Greig is a ball of hate that doesn’t quit on a play. His combination of skill and “rat” gives Team Canada the flexibility to deploy him in a variety of roles.

Team Finland

Aatu Raty

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-two | 185 pounds | New York Islanders (second round, 52nd overall in 2021)

Raty is developing nicely for the Islanders and coming off a productive season. He scored 13 goals and 27 assists for 40 points playing for Jukurit in Liiga before coming to North America to join Bridgeport in the AHL. Impressively he contributed one goal and four points in six playoff games for Bridgeport. He will be leaned on heavily to contribute offensively at the tournament but it won’t only be offence Team Finland needs from Raty. He will be tasked with key matchups and need to play a full 200 foot game.

Roni Hirvonen

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Forward | Left shot | Five-foot-nine | 176 pounds | Toronto Maple Leafs (second round, 59th overall in 2020)

Hirvonen is an infectious, lead by example, relentless worker. He has always been a leader on the Finnish national team and it looks like he is going to captain the group at this event. Team Finland will be relying on his detailed three-zone energy while hoping he can contribute offensively as well.

Brad Lambert

Forward | Right shot | Six-foot | 183 pounds | Winnipeg Jets (first round, 30th overall in 2022)

The Christmas version of this event was cut short due to the pandemic, which was unfortunate for Lambert. He was off to a flying start in his first two games. He can play the game quick and fast and have an impact offensively. With last season in the rearview mirror (he struggled to gain consistent momentum playing in Liiga) I’m looking for him to have an impact at this event. His offensive element is waiting to break out.

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Team Czechia

David Jiricek

Defenceman | Right shot | Six-foot-three | 190 pounds | Columbus Blue Jackets (first round, sixth overall in 2022)

Jiricek will be tasked with matching up against top lines and being deployed in all situations. There won’t be any easy minutes for the Columbus Blue Jackets first-round pick. He has a good stick, some deception, the ability to make plays on the offensive blue line, and an absolute bomb of a shot when he finds space. It will be interesting to see how he handles defending against the speed rush and containing opponents along the wall in his zone.

Jiri Kulich

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot | 180 pounds | Buffalo Sabres (first round, 28th overall in 2022)

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Kulich had a breakout tournament at the U18 Worlds in Germany in the spring where he scored nine goals and 11 points. He was the most lethal goal scorer at the event. Team Czechia will need him to contribute on the power play at this event. He’s a goal scorer who finds quiet ice in the offensive zone and wastes little time directing pucks on net.


Jan Bednar

Goalie | Catches left | Six-foot-four | 201 pounds | Detroit Red Wings (fourth round, 107th overall in 2020)

Team Czechia has a history of using more than one goalie at this event so it’s not a given that Bednar gets the net and keeps it. Having said that, the team will need big saves throughout the tournament and Bednar appears to have the most capable pedigree to give them a chance. This tournament could provide Bednar an opportunity to impress the Red Wings brass. He’s unsigned to date so he will want to prove he’s ready for a contract.

Team Slovakia

Dalibor Dvorsky

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-one | 190 pounds | 2023 NHL Draft eligible

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Another potentially elite Slovakian player on the horizon. Dvorsky is eligible for the 2023 draft and has the ability to push his way up the board before next June. He brings size, good pace and excellent puck skill. Dvorsky has a quick release in tight quarters and the ability to spin off checks along the wall. He scored 20 goals and 20 assists for 40 points for AIK in the Swedish U20 league last season along with 14 goals and 11 assists for 25 points representing Slovakia at the U18 level.

Adam Sykora

Forward | Left shot | Five-foot-11 | 174 pounds | New York Rangers (second round, 63rd overall in 2022)

If you watched the men’s World Championships in the spring you would have viewed this infectious player. He brings high end compete and energy. Sykora plays quick and he’s relentless. He has better than average offensive upside. Team Slovakia will be counting on him to not only bring his usual high end compete but also create offence.

Maxim Strbak

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Defenceman | Right shot | Six-foot-two | 183 pounds | 2023 NHL Draft eligible

Strbak is a player that has been deployed in all situations at the U18 level for Slovakia. On the PP he is more of a distributor than a shooter but does have the ability to direct pucks on net from range. Defensively he isn’t shy about gapping up and taking away space. It’s a big ask for a defenceman his age at this tournament. It will be interesting to see how he handles older opponents.

Team Latvia

Dans Locmelis

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot | 170 pounds | Boston Bruins (fourth round, 119th overall in 2022)

It will be a big ask for Locmelis to produce the level of offence that Latvia requires to have success at this event but he is one of their more skilled forwards. He sees the ice and distributes very well through seems. If space opens up he is capable of scoring goals and beating opponents one-on-one on his own. He’s young for the event and will be tested physically. Locmelis is scheduled to come to the USHL next season to play for the Youngstown Phantoms.

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Sandis Vilmanis

Forward | Left shot | Six-foot-one | 192 pounds | Florida Panthers (fifth round, 157th overall in 2022)

Vilmanis is also young for this tournament but he’s coming off a decent U18 Worlds in Germany. When he gets pucks in open ice he has an extra gear and the ability to slip between defenders. He will be deployed at even strength and the power play. He’s a shooter more than a distributor and usually sets up on the weak side flank to one time pucks. His 200-foot game is average so Latvia will be hoping he can chip in offensively and play to his strengths. Vilmanis was selected by the Sarnia Sting (CHL/OHL) in the most recent import draft.

Goaltenders

It’s likely more than one of these goaltenders will see action at this tournament and be leaned on heavily to come up with timely saves. None have been drafted to NHL clubs. It’s likely this group will be under duress playing in this group so they will have to have career weeks to give Latvia a chance:

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Patriks Berzins: Catches left | Six-foot-one | 165 pounds | Latvian national team

Bruno Bruveris: Catches left | Six-foot | 168 pounds | Cedar Rapids RoughRiders (USHL)

Rudolfs Lazdins: Catches left | Six-foot-one | 163 pounds | HK Riga (MHL)

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