Connect with us

Uncategorized

How Many Beaches Are In The World? (Updated 2022)

Published

on


 

Some of the most relaxing and beautiful places in the world are beaches.

Advertisement

Every year, the beaches of the world attract millions of people to their sandy shores.

You can find beaches on any continent, and while they may all look different, they have the same layouts and are formed in many of the same ways.

Understanding the definition of a beach and how beaches are made makes it easier to see why it is so hard to determine a specific number of beaches in the world.

Even though many beaches have specific boundaries and names, many other beach areas remain unclaimed and untouched but are still considered beaches.

 

Advertisement

How Many Beaches Are In The World?

Palm Beach, Florida

 

It is estimated that 31 percent of the world’s coastlines are sandy.

There are around 372,000 miles of coastline in the world.

New beaches are formed every day, and some are also destroyed just as easily.

A strip of land does not need to be designated a beach or named as a beach to be considered a beach.

Advertisement

In fact, some of the best and most beautiful beaches in the world are those that are hidden away and hard to find.

A beach is any type of landform connected to the ocean.

Any body of water can have a beach around it, and beaches can consist of different types of sediment and landscapes.

Sediment may settle with different densities that help to shape the beach.

Since beaches are constantly being shaped by the moving water around them, a beach may change its shape or layout often.

Advertisement

Some beaches can be made in a matter of a few days, and they can be destroyed just as fast.

Hurricanes and other extreme weather events can easily create new beaches and also completely change the layout of a beach by removing the sediment or stirring it up to create different borders or densities.

 

Are Beaches Only Found Around The Ocean?

Waikiki beach, hawaii

 

While most people think of the ocean when they think of beaches, beaches can actually form around any body of water.

Advertisement

A beach is the area of land that runs next to a body of water, so a beach can be present on lakes, rivers, seas, ponds, and of course, oceans.

Different types of waterways often have different types of beaches.

The body of water can also determine the size of the beach.

Lakes can have beaches.

Many lakes have very large beaches that are made up of sand or very fine gravel.

Advertisement

Some large lakes, such as the Great Lakes in the United States, are just as popular as coastal beaches.

Because they are so large, many lakes also have waves that help create natural beaches.

The waves may not be as strong as those on ocean beaches, but they are still capable of pulling sand and gravel towards the land and creating dunes and beaches.

Some lakes have man-made beaches where sand or other materials have been brought in to build up the land around the lake to make it more appealing to visitors and to make it a more functional body of water.

Rivers can have beaches just as oceans and lakes do.

Advertisement

Rivers are always moving, and even when it’s not noticeable, the water is moving sand, soil, and clay to the sides to make a beach.

These beaches are normally soft and muddy, and they often change as the water moves and floods.

River beaches are also much narrower than other types of beaches and usually appear on either side of the waterway.

Rivers can run into oceans, and at the area where they meet, a beachy area called an estuary may form.

 

Advertisement

What Are The Best Beaches In The World?

Palm trees hanging over stunning tropical lagoon

 

The best beaches in the world are often ranked by travel websites and magazines and are based on tourist-related activities.

What makes a beach the best beach is a matter of personal preference, but according to US News, the top 10 beaches in the world are as follows:

 

Which State Has The Best Beaches?

Miami Beach

 

Hawaii and Florida are the two states in the United States that are considered to have the most beaches.

Advertisement

Although it is impossible to count all of the beaches in these states, both states have numerous islands that have beaches on them.

Hawaii itself is a large island chain, and Florida is a peninsula, which means most of the state is made up of shorelines.

While many of the beach areas in these states are divided into named or designated beaches, many other beachy areas are not named or recognized as beaches, even though the landscape fits the definition of a beach.

 

 

Advertisement

Do All Beaches Have Sand?

Two orange pellet bean filiing ban at mazing vibrant beach with turquoise water

 

While many beaches are sandy, this is not the case for all beaches.

Some beaches are made up of other types of sediment, and it depends on the area around the beach in which sediment is present.

Natural beaches tend to be made up of different types of sediment and are often combinations of sand, pebbles, and soil.

Man-made beaches are typically more sandy as the sand is dredged offshore and brought in to make the beaches more attractive.

Advertisement

 

How Are Beaches Formed?

Two starfish on a beach

 

The movement of ocean waves works against coral and various sediment and mineral deposits that are found offshore in the ocean.

As these pieces break free, the waves help to churn and mix them until they are ground up into tiny particles that resemble sand or pebbles.

These same waves also push the small bits of sediment around and towards land.

Advertisement

Over time, the waves push the sand and sediment into the same locations, and beaches begin to form.

The waves continue to add more sand and pebbles and shape the beach as time goes on.

Man-made beaches are made in much the same way, except instead of waiting for nature to move all the sediment to create a beach, humans do it faster.

Large quantities of sand, rocks, and pebbles are brought in from other areas and used to create the desired shape of the beach.

This can be done to help improve the look and design of a natural beach, or entirely new beaches can be built from scratch.

Advertisement

Man-made beaches are also susceptible to erosion and are more likely to be destroyed in the event of a flood or hurricane.

Man-made beaches are constantly being renourished and maintained to ensure they look great.

 

What Are The Different Types Of Beaches?

Aerial view of the beach in Santa Monica, CA

 

There are several different types of beaches, and each has its own geography and ecosystem.

Advertisement

The area of the world where the beach is located can have an effect on the types of beach that forms.

Sandy beaches are what most people think of when they think of a beach.

Sandy beaches can be natural or man-made.

These beaches are often the most preferred type of beach because the sand creates a soft place to sit or lie while tanning.

The sand also provides plenty of entertainment for those who wish to hunt shells, treasure, or build sandcastles.

Advertisement

Most artificial beaches are made of sand that is brought in from an area of the same beach but offshore.

Sand is dredged, filtered, and placed in the desired location to create the look of the beach.

Different types of sandy beaches also have different sand colors.

  • White Sand
  • Black Sand
  • Red Sand
  • Orange Sand
  • Green Sand
  • Pink Sand
  • Blue Sand
  • Purple Sand

 

Pebble beaches tend to be a little rougher and rockier.

The small pebbles are ground from larger pieces of rock or coral that are pushed against the land and broken up.

Advertisement

It may not be as fine as sand, but the pebbles can still be soft enough to make it possible to sit or lie on the beach.

Pebble beaches can be natural and are often mixed with sand.

Many pebble beaches have sand added to them as part of maintenance and renourishment projects.

The small pebbles are covered in sand to improve their appearance but left in place to help create a stronger beach that is less likely to be susceptible to erosion and storms.

In some areas of the world, oceans and lakes run right up against caves.

Advertisement

The caves may fill with water based on the changing tides.

Some caves are fully submerged at all times, and others become accessible when the tide is low but are covered and hidden when the tide rises.

Cave beaches are usually very rough and rocky, and some can have sand or pebbles around the entrances to the caves.

Boulder beaches are also rocky and can have very beautiful but also dangerous landscapes.

The boulders can roll or break off of larger rocky areas such as cliffs and fall into the ocean.

Advertisement

Sand and sediment form around the boulders to create a beach area.

When the tides are low, small holes can fill up with water and allow sea creatures to be trapped inside.

These tide pools are great for fishing and observing different creatures.

When the tide comes back in, the water covers the boulders and the tide pools and allows the animals to get free again.

Planted beaches occur when oceans or jungles grow right up against the edge of the water.

Advertisement

These beaches tend to have a more exotic appearance and are shadier than other types of beaches.

Only certain types of trees and plants can grow near beaches as the water can affect their growth.

Planted beaches can make it harder to access the water, but many planted beaches also have some type of rock, sand, or sediment that helps to secure the plants in place.

 

What Are The Different Types Of Shorelines?

People on the beach

 

Advertisement

Shorelines are very similar to beaches, and beaches can be shorelines.

Shorelines can be other things besides beaches, and there are several different types of common shorelines.

Marshes and coastal wetlands are areas that butt up against beaches and make up a unique shoreline habitat.

These areas are very affected by the tides.

When the tide is high, the marshes and wetlands are covered by the water completely.

Advertisement

Many also stay submerged for long periods.

As the tide recedes, the wetlands and marshes are revealed and may dry up for short periods.

This results in truly unique ecosystems that are made up of plants and animals that can’t live in other settings.

Estuaries are found at the mouths of rivers and streams, where they open up to the ocean.

They can also be affected by the tide and are home to many unique plants and animals.

Advertisement

Estuaries are very muddy as the water is often moving at different speeds that churn up the water and even mix freshwater and saltwater together.

Estuaries are very susceptible to flooding, and they are also easily affected by human activity.

Bedrock shorelines are very stable and strong.

They are not likely to show signs of erosion and are able to be built upon.

They tend to look like mountainous areas that jut out over waterways.

Advertisement

Beaches may form at the base of the bedrock, and the large rocks are able to protect these beachy areas.

Beaches found around bedrock shorelines are more likely to maintain their shape and be less susceptible to storms and changes.

 

Are All Beaches Natural?

Aerial view of artificial Palm island

 

There are many natural beaches all over the world, but not all beaches are natural.

Advertisement

Natural beaches take thousands of years to form, and they are always changing.

Man-made beaches are very common, especially in tourist areas.

Many resorts, hotels, state, and national parks, and even private locations build beaches to make the land more appealing and more functional.

Some natural beaches are also built up to change the shape and size and to bring in sand or other sediments that look better and are more comfortable for beach activities.

The post How Many Beaches Are In The World? (Updated 2022) appeared first on The Cold Wire.

Advertisement



Source link

Uncategorized

Inside Texas' Steve Sarkisian magic touch developing QBs

Published

on




With Quinn Ewers potentially returning for Texas in Week 5, coach Steve Sarkisian’s ability to mold QBs will again be on display.



Source link

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Deebo Samuel, 49ers' defense shine in win over Rams: 'He's just such a stud'

Published

on




“He delivers for us in our biggest moments at all times, especially against that damn team,” Mike McGlinchey said of Samuel. “He’s just such a stud.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Winless in five pre-season games, Canucks have a lot of work to do

Published

on


The Vancouver Canucks have scored seven goals in five winless pre-season games. The Edmonton Oilers scored seven goals against them on Monday.

A mismatch in lineup strength led predictably to a mismatch on the scoreboard, although the Canucks competed and stayed close for two periods before dissolving late in the third and losing 7-2.

The second-tier Canucks displayed more intensity and effort than many of the top players had in previous games, but still fell to 0-3-2. The team has a lot of work to do this week in its final two pre-season games to get ready for its National Hockey League regular season, which begins against the Oilers in Edmonton next Wednesday.

Advertisement

“You just want to see the right things being done,” coach Bruce Boudreau told reporters Monday morning. “That’s probably why I was upset the other night. No matter who you’ve got in the lineup, you never want to get out worked.”

Unlike in Saturday’s lifeless 4-0 loss against the Seattle Kraken, the Canucks were not outworked by the Oilers. But they were outgunned, dressing a lineup that may have as few as five or six players back in Edmonton for the game that counts. And they were out-goaltended.

But by the end, it wasn’t the Oilers’ stars that sunk them — Conor McDavid, Leon Draisaitl, Evander Kane and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins combined for one assist — but a hat trick by NHL-hopeful Dylan Holloway and a pair of late goals by Warren Foegele.

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-282395” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

Advertisement

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

Advertisement

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-282395” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: true,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6313218173112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/6313218173112-1024×576.jpg”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/nhl/video/oilers-holloway-completes-natural-hat-trick-canucks/”
});
});

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-523461” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6313218173112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

Advertisement

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-523461” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: false,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6313218173112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/6313218173112-1024×576.jpg”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/nhl/video/oilers-holloway-completes-natural-hat-trick-canucks/”
});
});

.acf-block-preview .br-video-thumbnail::before {
content: “”;
position: absolute;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-moz-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-ms-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-o-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
width: 20px;
height: 24px;
border-top: 14px solid transparent;
border-left: 22px solid #fff;
border-bottom: 14px solid transparent;
margin-left: 3px;
}

Advertisement

Nils Hoglander and Conor Garland scored for the Canucks, who were tied 1-1 halfway through the game and trailed 3-2 until Tyson Barrie was left unchecked on an outnumbered rush late in the second period.

The Canucks close out their pre-season with home games Wednesday, in Abbotsford against the Oilers, and Friday at Rogers Arena against the Arizona Coyotes.

“I think we’ll get down to our team pretty soon and I think we’ll be fine after that,” Boudreau said before the game-day flight to Edmonton. “I’ve got a lot of faith in this group. I told them that today: I think they’re a really good team and, you know, we’re just going to ramp it up pretty soon.”

Better be very soon.

.acf-block-preview .br-snippet {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: 200px 1fr;
gap: 20px;
width: 100%;
margin: 0 auto;
padding: 16px;
border: 1px solid #CECECE;
background-color: #FFF;
border-radius: 4px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info a {
text-decoration: none;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-title {
color: #343434;
font-family: ‘roboto’;
font-size: 20px;
font-weight: 600;
line-height: 22px;
margin-bottom: 10px;
top: -3px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-body {
color: #343434;
font-family: ‘urw-din’;
font-size: 16px;
line-height: 20px;
margin-bottom: 12px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-link-title {
display: inline-block;
font-family: ‘urw-din’;
font-size: 16px;
list-style-type: none;
width: auto;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-link-title:not(:last-child):after {
content: ‘ | ‘;
color: #343434;
}

AN A ON D

After losing meekly in Seattle with five NHL defencemen in their lineup, the Canucks on Monday didn’t have anyone on the blue line guaranteed to be playing opening night, although it’s hard to imagine that Kyle Burroughs won’t be on the roster given his solid, combative pre-season.

Advertisement

But it looked for much of the game like Christian Wolanin, the 27-year-old journeyman signed as a free agent to boost organizational depth, was the best defenceman on either team.

Logging top-pairing minutes and quarterbacking the first-unit power play, Wolanin was all over the ice and set up both Canucks goals, including a beautiful no-look dish to Hoglander for a power-play marker that tied the game early in the second.

Wolanin also hit a crossbar and a post while finishing with five shot attempts, three blocks, 22:12 of ice time and an expected goals-for of 57.6 per cent at five on five.

Barring further Canuck injuries, he still isn’t making the NHL lineup. But it was an impressive performance that will have been noted by the Canucks and others.

Advertisement

NO PUSH FROM BELOW

Although there was re-assuring effort shown by the modest lineup, it has been disappointing in the pre-season that none of the Canucks prospects, besides Swedish League free agents Linus Karlsson and Nils Aman and veteran minor-league centre Sheldon Dries, has made a serious push for NHL employment.

Speedy, hit-seekiing winger Will Lockwood had his best game on Monday, but hasn’t done nearly enough. Winger Danila Klimovich, so good at the rookie tournament in Penticton two weeks ago, looks lost among NHL players and was minus-three with a 9.7 xGF%. Defenceman Jet Woo is already assigned to the American League, and Brady Keeper has a long way to go to work back from last season’s broken leg. And we’re not sure goalie Mike DiPietro is still in the organization.

None of these players, with the possible exception of Lockwood, was expected to make the Canucks this fall. But all teams want to see their prospects pushing upwards, trying to force their way to the NHL or at least make roster decisions difficult. That hasn’t happened.

Minor-league goalie Arturs Silovs has been good, but the competition for depth jobs seems to be almost entirely between the NHL depth players who were already on the projected roster.

Advertisement

GOALTENDING HIERARCHY

One year ago, on the eve of last season, DiPietro firmly held the No. 3 spot in the organization. He was the presumed minor-league starter, a Canucks injury away from playing in the NHL. He was a key prospect, Now he is the distant No. 5 in the organization, an after-thought who has played just a single pre-season period – mopping up for the Canucks’ travelling split-squad on the opening night of exhibition games.

Collin Delia, a 28-year-old minor-leaguer signed in July as a free agent to push for playing time with the Abbotsford Canucks, played the full game against the Oilers. He made some strong saves, but allowing seven goals on 36 shots is never going to be good enough, even if the team collapsed in front of him at the end and allowed the Oilers to score three times in the last three minutes.

But that he got the start at all was significant.

The Canucks’ final two warmup games will be handled largely — possibly entirely — by NHL goalies Thatcher Demko and Spencer Martin. So the auditioning in goal may be done for now. And DiPietro is last.

Advertisement

No wonder he is looking for a fresh start elsewhere.

.acf-block-preview .instagram-twitter-container {
width: 340px;
margin: 0 auto;
}

THE MARK OF LAZAR

After Boudreau’s pre-game call to action, one of the best Canucks was experienced centre Curtis Lazar, who was signed in July to be Vancouver’s fourth-line centre but played higher up the lineup against the Oilers.

He led by example, which is what the Canucks expected when they grabbed the 27-year-old free agent who has logged 404 NHL games but figured out how to be an everyday, depth contributor only during the last couple of seasons with the Boston Bruins.

Advertisement

Lazar was so engaged physically he drew a roughing penalty from Draisaitl and apparently frustrated McDavid enough on another shift that the best player in hockey cross-checked Burroughs. Lazar finished with four shots on net.

He had been playing right wing during the pre-season, but Boudreau swapped him and Jason Dickinson, moving Dickinson to the wing, and got Lazar’s A-game at centre.

“Curtis Lazar, I thought you could tell he played on a winning, championship-type team,” Boudreau said after the game. “And I thought Pods (Vasily Podkolzin) was an awful lot better than he was the other night. Good, quality playing from a couple of those guys that really gave themselves a chance.”

.acf-block-preview .br-related-links-wrapper {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: repeat(2, 1fr);
gap: 20px;
}

.acf-block-preview .br-related-links-wrapper a {
pointer-events: none;
cursor: default;
text-decoration: none;
color: black;
}




Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending