Connect with us

Uncategorized

25 Types Of Candles (2022 Updated)

Published

on


 

Candles have played a significant role in the home and outdoor lighting and décor for a long time.

Advertisement

According to a 2010 report, the demand for wax had risen to almost 10 billion pounds with the candle share at approximately 50%.

Research also shows that seven out of 10 American households use candles, which totals about $3.2 billion yearly.

They come in a wide range of shapes, fragrances, waxes, colors, and uses.

Nevertheless, choosing the ideal candle for a particular occasion can be overwhelming.

Here’s a detailed breakdown of the different types of candles and how best to use them.

Advertisement

 

25 Types Of Candles

 

1. Votive Candles

Royal Imports Votive Candle, Unscented White Wax, Box of 72, for Wedding, Birthday, Holiday & Home Decoration (10 Hour)

Royal Imports Votive Candle, Unscented White Wax, Box of 72, for Wedding, Birthday, Holiday & Home Decoration (10 Hour) 

 

These candles are a handy option that you can use to liven up any space in your home or office.

Advertisement

While a votive candle could easily be confused with tea light candles, both candle types have significant differences.

Votive candles are small but bigger than tea light candles.

They are approximately 2.5 inches tall and 2 inches wide.

Tea lights have their own containers.

You will, however, need to find a holding container for your votive candle to use it safely.

Advertisement

While they come in a variety of colors, white is the most common as it creates a perfect atmosphere in any setting.

Votive candles burn for long periods, which is surprising given their size.

They also don’t produce smoke.

The best thing about them is once they burn to the bottom, a votive candle will simply burn out without posing a fire risk.

 

Advertisement

2. Tea Light Candles

Stonebriar 100 Pack Unscented Tea Light Candles with 6-7 Hour Extended Burn Time

Stonebriar 100 Pack Unscented Tea Light Candles with 6-7 Hour Extended Burn Time 

 

They are the smallest (38 mm wide) and come in small plastic or metal containers.

Tea light candles burn for about five hours and are a great way of accenting an intimate space.

Given their size, these candles give off very little light.

Advertisement

You must therefore light several and group them up to enjoy enough light.

Nevertheless, their main objective is to set an intimate and cozy mood, making them an ideal decoration for romantic dinner dates, parties, or some personal time off.

They are cheap and readily available.

You can easily recognize them, thanks to their small size and metal container.

 

Advertisement

3. Flameless Candles

OSHINE Flameless Candles Set of 9 Ivory Dripless Real Wax Pillars Include Realistic Moving Wick LED Flames and 10-Key Remote Control with 24-Hour Timer Function 300+ Hours

OSHINE Flameless Candles Set of 9 Ivory Dripless Real Wax Pillars Include Realistic Moving Wick LED Flames and 10-Key Remote Control with 24-Hour Timer Function 300+ Hours 

 

These are an electric alternative to normal candles.

Most are battery-operated and come with a remote.

Flameless candles don’t produce heat or smoke.

Advertisement

They come in various designs and fragrances for both interior and exterior use.

They are becoming increasingly popular, especially where children are involved, for safety reasons.

These candles produce enough light to create an inviting environment for your occasion.

Although electric, they are not static.

Rather, they flicker and move just like normal candles, which gives them a natural appearance.

Advertisement

Some flameless candles can be programmed to turn on and burn at a specific time.

Those with remote controls allow you to easily turn them on and off at once without moving from one candle to the next.

 

4. Taper Candles

Hyoola 12 Pack Tall Taper Candles - 10 Inch White Dripless, Unscented Dinner Candle - Paraffin Wax with Cotton Wicks - 8 Hour Burn Time

Hyoola 12 Pack Tall Taper Candles – 10 Inch White Dripless, Unscented Dinner Candle – Paraffin Wax with Cotton Wicks – 8 Hour Burn Time 

 

Advertisement

Taper candles are tall, thin, and mostly cylindrical.

They generally burn for a very long time and require a candleholder since they can’t stand on their own.

A typical taper candle is about 12 inches long and can burn for at least 10 hours.

They come in different shapes and colors.

While a typical taper candle is cylindrical, some are also ribbed or twisted to add visual appeal and uniqueness.

Advertisement

These candles are ideal for a special table setting such as a romantic dinner or a party where you don’t want to keep checking your candles.

They can also be used for mantel décor.

 

5. Pillar Candles

Stonebriar SB-SP-3548A Tall 3 x 6 Inch Unscented Ivory Pillar Candle Set, Set of 6, 3x6

Stonebriar SB-SP-3548A Tall 3 x 6 Inch Unscented Ivory Pillar Candle Set, Set of 6, 3×6 

 

Advertisement

These candles come at various heights, with some being as tall as taper candles.

The shortest pillar candle is three inches, while the tallest is 16 inches.

They are made from dense paraffin wax or palm wax, which allows them to stand independently without a holder.

They are splendidly commanding and breathtaking when lit.

Some pillar candles are made with up to three wicks due to their large size.

Advertisement

More wicks ensure that you control the intensity of light.

Light your candle on a flat, heat-resistant surface to avoid damage as the wick burns lower.

Keep an eye on your pillar candles as they can easily be knocked over due to a lack of protective jars.

While they are designed in different shapes and sizes, most pillar candles are cylindrical.

You can light one or several and place them on mantels, lanterns, or as table centerpieces to accent lighting in your home.

Advertisement

 

6. Container Candles

Container Candles

 

Container candles come packed in safe, non-combustible containers usually made of metal or glass.

They are typically poured directly into the container, thus making them safe as the candle is firmly in place at all times.

The candles often come with a lid, which prevents them from releasing fragrance into the air when not in use.

Advertisement

Container candles are made in a wide range of sizes, fragrances, wicks, and colors.

Container candles are mostly manufactured by eco-friendly companies.

Most containers can be reused for new candles or other things.

These candles are safer due to their stability and are great for outdoor events or parties with lots of energy.

The containers are designed to handle the heat produced when burning.

Advertisement

They are also visually appealing given their numerous designs, sizes, and shapes.

Some manufacturers also come up with elaborate shapes such as stars to create a functional and artistic look and feel.

 

7. Floating Candles

Royal Imports 10 Hour Floating Candles, 3” White Unscented Dripless Wax Discs, for Cylinder Vases, Centerpieces at Wedding, Party, Pool, Holiday (24 Set)

Royal Imports 10 Hour Floating Candles, 3” White Unscented Dripless Wax Discs, for Cylinder Vases, Centerpieces at Wedding, Party, Pool, Holiday (24 Set) 

 

Advertisement

Floating candles are lightweight and thus able to float on water when burning.

They are relatively small in size when compared to other candle types, but can burn for several hours.

Unlike other candles that require a holder or a flat surface when burning, floating candles need a bowl or a container large enough for free movement.

The main advantage of floating candles is that you don’t have to worry about knocking over the candles or wax spillage.

These candles can add a festive feel to a table setting and instantly add a warm touch to an event when used appropriately.

Advertisement

They create quite a spectacle, especially when moving in a spacious container.

You can also add some flowers or petals to the bowl for a more dramatic effect.

 

8. Birthday Candles

PHD CAKE 24-Count Gold Long Thin Metallic Birthday Candles, Cake Candles, Birthday Parties, Wedding Decorations, Party Candles

PHD CAKE 24-Count Gold Long Thin Metallic Birthday Candles, Cake Candles, Birthday Parties, Wedding Decorations, Party Candles 

 

Advertisement

Birthday candles are incredibly thin and light cake toppers.

These classic celebration candles come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, colors, and designs.

They are usually used on celebratory cakes.

While birthday candles light very fast, they give you ample time to make a wish or blow them out before burning out.

There are numerous types of birthday candles, with the most popular being:

Advertisement
  • Trick candles: These candles relight themselves when you try to blow them out. Their wick is coated with magnesium powder, which can reignite itself every time it’s blown out. After the fun, run the wick underwater to truly put the flame out.
  • Sparkler candles: They allow a fun twist to the festivity. These candles give off fun glittery sparks when lit. Once lit, wait for about a minute. The sparks will die on their own. You cannot blow them out.

 

9. Cotton Wick Candles

EricX Light 100 Piece Cotton Candle Wick 6" Pre-Waxed for Candle Making,Candle DIY

EricX Light 100 Piece Cotton Candle Wick 6″ Pre-Waxed for Candle Making,Candle DIY 

 

Cotton or paper core wick candles burn a lot faster and hotter than other types of candle wicks.

Cotton wick candles produce more melted wax than other candle wicks.

These wicks are generally used in wax-filled glass candles due to their ease of burning.

Advertisement

 

10. Metal Core Wick Candles

EricX Light Zinc Core Candle Wick 225ft Spool Specialize for Votive or Container Candle Making,Large

EricX Light Zinc Core Candle Wick 225ft Spool Specialize for Votive or Container Candle Making,Large 

 

Metalcore wicks are usually made of zinc or tin.

The metal is normally left standing as the wax melts, leaving the candle looking nicer for longer.

Advertisement

They are mostly used to make votive and pillar candles.

Initially, there were safety concerns over the use of metal in making candle wicks and allowing them to burn.

Studies show that both zinc and tin are non-toxic and therefore safe to use as candle wicks.

While lead was among the metals used to make candle wicks, it was later banned as it contains impurities that could be harmful when burnt and released into the air.

 

Advertisement

11. Wood Wick Candles

Eucalyptus & Orange Scented Candles for Home Scented | Wood Wicked Candles | Eucalyptus Candle | 8 oz 45 Hour Burn, All Natural Soy Candle, Calming Aromatherapy Candles in Rose Gold Glass Jar

Eucalyptus & Orange Scented Candles for Home Scented | Wood Wicked Candles | Eucalyptus Candle | 8 oz 45 Hour Burn, All Natural Soy Candle, Calming Aromatherapy Candles in Rose Gold Glass Jar 

 

Wood wick candles produce a crackling sound when lit.

The sound adds to the magic and uniqueness of the moment.

It’s wider than the regular cotton wick, which allows it to burn evenly and for longer.

Advertisement

When trimmed after each use, a wood wick exhibits a cleaner burn than a cotton wick as it produces less carbon and debris.

This is a great wick as it leaves you with very little mess to clean up after use.

 

12. Multiple Wick Candles

MODREA Candles Outdoor Scented Citronella, Natural Soy Wax Candles, Big Portable Travel Tin 3 Multiple-Wick Candles for Summer

MODREA Candles Outdoor Scented Citronella, Natural Soy Wax Candles, Big Portable Travel Tin 3 Multiple-Wick Candles for Summer 

 

Advertisement

If you usually find yourself running around lighting all your candles on time, save your energy and try multiple wick candles.

In addition to spreading the light and scent quicker, more wicks in one holder look stylish.

In addition to producing more light, multiple wick candles burn more evenly.

They also give off more fragrance if scented than single wick candles.

Trim the wicks often for an even and clean burn.

Advertisement

 

13. Palm Wax Candles

ALEXES Palm Wax for Candle Making - 1 lb Palm Wax Flakes - Sustainable Palm Wax for Candle Making - Organic Palm Wax Flakes for Candles – Natural Candle Making Wax

ALEXES Palm Wax for Candle Making – 1 lb Palm Wax Flakes – Sustainable Palm Wax for Candle Making – Organic Palm Wax Flakes for Candles – Natural Candle Making Wax 

 

Palm wax is the thickest among all other types of wax used to make candles.

This makes the wax last long, ensuring the candle has a longer burn time.

Advertisement

The wax is also biodegradable, making it easier to dispose of in a greenway.

Palm wax is made by placing palm oil under high temperature and pressure, which separates fatty acids from the oil.

The fatty acids are then used to make palm wax.

 

14. Soy Wax Candles

YFYTRE 4 Pack Scented Candle Set Soy Wax Candles, Aromatherapy Candles for Home Decoration, Jar Candles Gift for Women with Amber Glass Jars and Kraft Wrapping

YFYTRE 4 Pack Scented Candle Set Soy Wax Candles, Aromatherapy Candles for Home Decoration, Jar Candles Gift for Women with Amber Glass Jars and Kraft Wrapping 

Advertisement

 

Made 100% from soybeans, soy wax candles continue to grow in popularity.

Being made from a natural and renewable source, these candles burn slowly and exhibit a cleaner burn.

They don’t produce carbon or other harmful pollutants when lit.

The candle produces a brighter and cooler flame with an almost fluorescent glow.

Advertisement

Soy wax candles have been shown to last three to five times longer than their counterparts.

A great alternative to paraffin wax, soy wax is becoming increasingly popular in making container candles.

 

15. Beeswax Candles

UCO 12-Hour Natural Beeswax Survival Candles, Long-Burning Emergency Candles Candle Lantern, 9 Pack

UCO 12-Hour Natural Beeswax Survival Candles, Long-Burning Emergency Candles Candle Lantern, 9 Pack 

 

Advertisement

From ancient Roman times, beeswax has been an excellent choice when making candles and wreaths.

Beeswax doesn’t drip as much, and its candles have a longer burn time.

Candles made from beeswax are generally more expensive than other types of candles for obvious reasons.

Beeswax candles burn much cleaner and for longer than candles made from paraffin and soy wax.

They are most popular for their bright, warm golden flame, delicate honey scent, hexagonal design, etc.

Advertisement

They are smokeless and act as a natural air purifier when burning.

Beeswax candles clean the air by reducing allergy-causing pollutants in the atmosphere.

 

16. Paraffin Wax Candles

Beautiful burning candles

 

Paraffin wax is the most common candle-making wax.

Advertisement

It’s also the cheapest.

Paraffin is a byproduct of petroleum and has a very high melting point.

It’s both colorless and odorless.

The wax is mainly used to make pillars and votive candles so they can be strong enough to stand independently.

Paraffin wax candles come in various colors and fragrances.

Advertisement

The odorless nature of paraffin wax makes it ideal for use with numerous scents.

Any color used to make paraffin wax candles brings out a visually appealing masterpiece.

This wax was first introduced into the candle-making industry in the late 19th century.

Its popularity increased in the years that followed until some researchers questioned its safety.

While there are arguments for and against paraffin wax use in candle production, it continues to be the most preferred wax among manufacturers.

Advertisement

 

17. Bayberry Wax Candles

Cape Candle - Real Bayberry Wax Tapers 10" (Boxed Pair)

Cape Candle – Real Bayberry Wax Tapers 10″ (Boxed Pair) 

 

Bayberry wax is made from the bayberry plant.

It has an olive-green color and comes with a strong natural scent.

Advertisement

Given that it’s not durable on its own, bayberry wax is usually mixed with beeswax to make sturdy candles.

The bayberries are boiled with the wax rising to the top.

It’s then collected and mixed with the beeswax.

This wax is mostly used to make holiday candles due to its refreshing natural fragrance when burning.

 

Advertisement

18. Liquid Wax Candles

Candles with liquid wax

 

Liquid wax candles are usually made from various oils.

They don’t produce carbon or smoke, therefore, they are a great option for office space.

These candles are made from mineral or paraffin oil and are ideal if you want to keep off the mess made by traditional candles.

You don’t have to worry about your surface getting damaged by spilled wax or cleaning soot and spilled candle wax.

Advertisement

 

19. Gel Candles

Swamp Shine Highly Scented 16 oz Mason Jar Moonshine Gel Candle | Shine of The South | Long Lasting 100 Hour Burn | Hand Poured in The USA (Vanilla)

Swamp Shine Highly Scented 16 oz Mason Jar Moonshine Gel Candle | Shine of The South | Long Lasting 100 Hour Burn | Hand Poured in The USA (Vanilla) 

 

These are an innovation in the candle manufacturing industry.

Gel candles are best known for producing ample light (almost double that of wax candles) and burning for much longer.

Advertisement

These candles are made from a blend of mineral oil and resin, giving them their signature clear look.

Gel candles often sport a dried flower, petals, or berries mixed in the gel for visual appeal.

They typically come in glass containers and are between three and nine millimeters tall.

If placed in the right location, they can really be therapeutic and soothing.

Gel candles produce a faint aroma more due to the natural gel scent than any deliberate scenting.

Advertisement

They bring out the best ambiance when placed at the dinner table or poolside.

Nonetheless, it’s important to note that the containers that hold these candles tend to heat up very fast.

It’s therefore prudent to refrain from burning these candles for more than two hours.

 

20. Scented Candles

Chesapeake Bay Candle Scented Candle, Balance + Harmony (Water Lily Pear), Medium

Chesapeake Bay Candle Scented Candle, Balance + Harmony (Water Lily Pear), Medium 

Advertisement

 

Scented candles are usually made from a blend of wax.

Their popularity increases during the festive season such as Christmas.

Essential oils or mineral oils are typically mixed into the wax to produce a pleasant aroma when burning.

Scented candles also come in various shapes and designs, such as pillars, tea lights, container candles, etc.

Advertisement

In addition to improving the appearance of your space, scented candles can significantly improve the fragrance of your home.

If there are unpleasant odors or musty smells in your home that you need to get rid of, scented candles are your best bet.

From peppermint to pine, to wood, and floral scents, you can easily find the perfect scented candle for your space.

Aromatherapy candles can also be categorized as scented.

They contain various essential oils, such as lavender, peppermint, etc., that are alleged to arouse different feelings when used in a certain way.

Advertisement

The fragrance from the candles when burning is said to help calm the mind, reduce stress, and revitalize the body, among other benefits.

 

21. Unscented Candles

Stonebriar Tall 3x6 Inch Unscented Pillar Candles,White, 6 count

Stonebriar Tall 3×6 Inch Unscented Pillar Candles,White, 6 count 

 

For those who prefer the beauty and feel that candles add to any setting minus the fragrance, unscented candles may be your treat.

Advertisement

Some people prefer unscented candles because they are allergic to certain smells or simply because they prefer going natural.

They are great if you don’t want competing aromas in your space and especially where food is involved.

Even without the perfume, these candles are as functional and stunning as their aromatic counterparts and can help transform your exterior or interior space perfectly.

 

22. Candle Sets

Scented Candles Gifts for Women Mom, Soy Candles for Home Scented, Elegant Candle Sets with Pure Essential Oil, Ideal for Birthday, Women's Day, Holiday

Scented Candles Gifts for Women Mom, Soy Candles for Home Scented, Elegant Candle Sets with Pure Essential Oil, Ideal for Birthday, Women’s Day, Holiday 

Advertisement

 

You can also opt to place several candles together in the same area to make a set.

Candles in a set come in varying sizes or shapes but exhibit a similar design or color.

Even with a similar design or theme, a candle set will not match seamlessly.

The glaring differences in some aspects bring out a striking cohesion and unusual perfection in the set.

Advertisement

 

23. Theme Candles

Spaceman Birthday Candle Outer Space Theme Rocket Candle for Birthday Party Childrens Day Baby Shower (Rocket)

Spaceman Birthday Candle Outer Space Theme Rocket Candle for Birthday Party Childrens Day Baby Shower (Rocket) 

 

Theme candles are a great way to decorate for any occasion.

You can opt to decorate your entire home using candles themed for various holidays across the calendar.

Advertisement

It’s a fun way to ensure inclusivity and uniqueness.

Themed candles allow you to create a pleasant atmosphere with a unique touch.

Let your guests enjoy the warmth and coziness that comes from an assorted design candle-lit party.

 

24. Dripless Candles

BOLSIUS 30 Count Household Ivory Taper Candles - 10 Inches - Premium European Quality - 8 Burn Hours - Bulk Pack Unscented Dripless and Smokeless Home Décor, Restaurant, Wedding, & Party Candlesticks

BOLSIUS 30 Count Household Ivory Taper Candles – 10 Inches – Premium European Quality – 8 Burn Hours – Bulk Pack Unscented Dripless and Smokeless Home Décor, Restaurant, Wedding, & Party Candlesticks 

Advertisement

 

Wax dripping down the sides and ruining the surface a candle is placed on is a major problem faced by most people.

Rather than being constantly on guard, it’s wise to invest in dripless candles.

With a dripless candle, you won’t have to worry about burns or damaged surfaces from dripping hot wax.

The candles appear neater, burn for a longer time, and produce a cleaner flame than regular candles.

Advertisement

 

25. Insect Repellent Candles

Murphy's Naturals Mosquito Repellent Candle | DEET Free | Made with Plant Based Essential Oils and a Soy/Beeswax Blend | 30 Hour Burn Time | 9oz | 2 Pack

Murphy’s Naturals Mosquito Repellent Candle | DEET Free | Made with Plant Based Essential Oils and a Soy/Beeswax Blend | 30 Hour Burn Time | 9oz | 2 Pack 

 

Most people spend time outdoors during summer having immeasurable fun after a cold period.

Also, animals, both small and big, come out of their habitats to enjoy the pleasant sunny and warm atmosphere.

Advertisement

While you can apply OTC insect repellants, some of them contain harmful chemicals.

It’s better to light insect repellant candles.

They not only drive away annoying insects but also transform the immediate environment into a cozy and more enjoyable space.

Nonetheless, the candles won’t work in windy weather or a very large space.

Citronella is derived from lemongrass that’s mostly used as a natural bug repellant in candles.

Advertisement

The plant-based essential oil has been used for many years as a pest repellant.

It produces a bright flame and a delicate citrus fragrance when ignited.

Place your insect repellant candle on your deck or patio and enjoy a bite-free evening.

The post 25 Types Of Candles (2022 Updated) appeared first on The Cold Wire.



Source link

Advertisement

Uncategorized

Discussing Carson Wentz’s potential, Sam Howell’s development with Commanders QBs coach Ken Zampese

Published

on


Ken Zampese oversees an intriguing quarterbacks room with the Washington Commanders entering the 2022 season. There’s Carson Wentz, the former No. 2 overall pick traded by the Philadelphia Eagles and Indianapolis Colts in consecutive seasons after failing to live up to expectations; Taylor Heinicke, the Old Dominion student-turned almost Tom Brady slayer (within a month!) and then the team’s full-time starter last season; and finally Sam Howell, a projected top-five draft pick before an underwhelming 2021 dropped him all the way to the fifth round.

Wentz’s seemingly final chance to be an NFL starter will unfold in Washington, while Heinicke will be anxiously waiting to be called upon if necessary and Howell will look to rediscover his 2020 magic as he acclimates himself to the NFL. Guiding all of these players is Zampese, 55, who enters his 19th season as an NFL quarterbacks coach.

Ahead of the Commanders’ preseason opener against the Carolina Panthers on Saturday afternoon, Zampese spoke with CBS Sports about Wentz’s potential, Howell’s continuing development and more.

Advertisement

The following interview has been edited for length and clarity.

What was your initial reaction when you found out Carson Wentz was joining the team?

“I was so excited I could hardly stand myself. My hope went through the roof, my confidence went through the roof. I just know when you add talent and you get a guy that’s accountable and you hold him accountable, good things are going to happen. When? Who knows. But we’re going to be moving in a positive direction all the time, and I knew that was a good deal. … I just know that he is a very capable NFL passer, and I’m very happy we got him here.”

What have been your impressions of Wentz since you started working with him?

“He’s locked into details. He wants to know and he wants to communicate it so that we’re all on the same page. That’s obvious from the time we started when it was just he and I. And then as we get the players into the building, you see the communication and going back to talk through a rep after it’s already been done, to come to a greater understanding so that when we go to the next time, you can anticipate it a little bit more, and you get better balls, better looks, better spots.”

Advertisement

Is that the main thing that has stood out about Wentz so far? Or have other things also caught your attention?

“That’s the one you want to have, because then the guy’s locked into what you’re doing and is trying to do it the way that we’re talking about doing it. And then he brings his own stuff from where he’s been to where there’s (additions) and there’s things that we subtracted, and we’re just making it our offense this year. It’s our 2022 Commanders offense.”

Any specific examples of his attention to detail?

“There are certain routes where we talk about, ‘Oh, our focus is over here,’ and he says, ‘Hey, if I can get this look on the backside, can we put this on it?’ So you know he’s seeing the whole field. And if we can do that and it works out and we can get another shot to throw it to Terry McLaurin), that’s a hell of a deal. It’s something where you’re seeing the whole field, how we’re using all the pieces, and he sees all the pieces and what we can do with them. That’s the fun part.”

What’s the biggest thing that’s going to change for the offense this year with Wentz at quarterback?

Advertisement

“Well he’s got his own unique style, which is different than the rest of them. He can reach the whole field easily. He’s really good at quick game. The usual things that have stood out. I mean I think he was in the top 10 in plus-20 air yard passes, something like that, so there’s some downfield elements that he brings; it’s natural to him. And then his style of leadership and communication in the building. He’s very personable, 1-on-1, being deliberate to get to each guy.”

Wentz’s accuracy has been inconsistent at times throughout camp, and coach Ron Rivera has attributed that to learning a new system and getting the rhythm and timing down with his speedy receivers. How long does it typically take for a quarterback in a new system to gain that baseline of comfortability?

“There’s no threshold. You just know it when you see it over time. The easy things stay easy. You don’t see the wheels spinning on an easy concept and it’s hard to get. Guys are getting it, it’s getting to the right spot. It’s also the quickness from one read to another, ‘Oh, shoot, OK, he’s got that one. We feel good about this concept. Let’s try and do more.’ There’s no kind of magic moment, but you kind of know it when you see it.”

Have you seen it so far during training camp?

“We’re in the process. Some days are better than other days, and that’s how training camp goes. … It’s no different than anybody else who walks into the building new. We’re not six years in with somebody. We are six months in with somebody, and even though some other guys have been here, we haven’t done it together. So we’re trying to build our sustainable winning culture within our offense.”

Advertisement

Wentz will start the preseason opener Saturday against the Panthers, and Rivera said he wants to see the starters get 15-20 snaps. What do you want to see from Wentz during that time?

“I just want to see the ball move down the field. It doesn’t matter to me how it works; just that it works and it’s smooth and we’re happy with the decisions and we’re finding ways to protect the football and take advantage of the defense and big plays when we get them. So yeah, just move the ball, convert some first downs, score — of course — and then just see the offense flow the way it’s supposed to, the way we’ve talked about it. And then we can come back with a greater confidence later because we actually did it on another level other than practice; we did it live.”

This is Wentz’s third team in as many years. What makes you think Washington can be a long-term fit for him?

“We’ve seen it on Sunday, him be productive on Sunday. And we have pretty good skill guys, and I think as you compare that with other spots he’s been in over time, it gives me hope that if we can get the ball out to these guys, we’ll be able to make some very, very productive plays — short range and down the field.”

Switching gears to Sam Howell: You’ve coached a lot of rookie quarterbacks who have gone on to be long-term starters (Carson Palmer, Andy Dalton, Baker Mayfield, etc.) What stands out about Howell in terms of what he brings to the NFL?

“He’s humble, he’s got a live arm, and he likes to be coached. That’s kind of Sam in a nutshell. He really gleans everything off of every meeting and wants to know, and anytime I say, ‘Hey Sam, let’s get together before or after practice,’ he says, ‘Yes sir,’ and we’re on it, we’re doing it. And that’s going to go a long way to his development toward being fast, not slow. He’s very coachable, he’s got a high motor for work and his focus is good, and he has a lot of pride. That’s the other thing that sticks out: he’s got a lot of pride. He sees himself in a very upwardly-mobile-in-this-profession way, and he should, because he can.

headshot-image
Advertisement

“He doesn’t give himself a crutch if he misses a throw. He knows he can make it because it should be easy for him in his mind because ‘I can do all of these things, and when I don’t, I’m very disappointed,’ as opposed to, ‘Yeah, you know I just missed one. Whatever.’ It’s not like that for him. He holds himself accountable very well.

“He’s not happy about it. Those things happen because guys are rookies, but when you don’t get something that doesn’t happen right, there’s a sting that goes along with it. And if you don’t use it for fuel, you don’t gain from the experience. He uses all the stings as fuel, and that’s the important part, no matter what year you are but particularly as a rookie because you get so many of them.”

Advertisement

What are the biggest areas you want to see him improve throughout his rookie campaign?

“I want to see his pocket moving and sliding to make a play. And then knowing when to cut your losses and run; just the natural feel of that part of the game, like to see that. We’ve seen him out here on one-hitch fire the ball around. He’s been very productive, and now we’ll get to see it in the game. I want to see the improvisational skills.”





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Uncategorized

By being himself, Schneider’s message is resonating with Blue Jays’ stars

Published

on


TORONTO — John Schneider arrived at spring training in 2008 with a life-changing decision to make. Six years, seven concussions and a major back surgery into his pro ball career with the Toronto Blue Jays, he’d topped out at triple-A. He had enough raw tools — strong receiver, a knack for getting on base, some pop — that he could keep grinding and perhaps find his way to a cup of coffee in The Show. But Voon Chong, his trainer in 2006-07, warned that another blow to the head would be major trouble. Dick Scott, the club’s farm director at the time, suggested a transitionary job coaching in the rookie-level Gulf Coast League if the 28-year-old was ready to move on. The club thought enough of him that the offer that would stand even if he first wanted a release to pursue a playing opportunity with another organization.

All the possibilities swirled in Schneider’s mind and his lean was toward coaching, which he’d already kicked around during the off-season. “Give me a few days,” he told Scott after their meeting. One morning, before heading over to a minor-league spring game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, as they were then called, he stopped manager Gary Cathcart. Bring another catcher for the trip, he said, because if he hit a homer that day, he was calling it a career right then and there. “Haha, OK,” is how Schneider remembers Cathcart’s response.

Sure enough, in his second at-bat, against a left-hander whose name he can’t recall, Schneider did indeed go deep. Cathcart gave him a knowing grin as they high-fived at third base. “I came in and literally took off my spikes, hung them up in the dugout and coached first the next inning. That was the last time I ever played,” says Schneider. “It was great. Went out on a high note. Because there are a lot of low notes in there.”

Advertisement

.acf-block-preview .br-snippet {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: 200px 1fr;
gap: 20px;
width: 100%;
margin: 0 auto;
padding: 16px;
border: 1px solid #CECECE;
background-color: #FFF;
border-radius: 4px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info a {
text-decoration: none;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-title {
color: #343434;
font-family: ‘roboto’;
font-size: 20px;
font-weight: 600;
line-height: 22px;
margin-bottom: 10px;
top: -3px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-body {
color: #343434;
font-family: ‘urw-din’;
font-size: 16px;
line-height: 20px;
margin-bottom: 12px;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-link-title {
display: inline-block;
font-family: ‘urw-din’;
font-size: 16px;
list-style-type: none;
width: auto;
}
.acf-block-preview .br-snippet-info .br-snippet-link-title:not(:last-child):after {
content: ‘ | ‘;
color: #343434;
}

Advertisement

The next morning, rather than sitting in the clubhouse with his teammates and friends, he was in the coaches room for his first day as hitting coach of the GCL Blue Jays, the beginning of a career arc that led to his promotion as interim manager of the big-league club on July 13. Like Cito Gaston in 1989, Schneider is a long-time franchise man with deep ties to his players essentially thrown behind the wheel of a speeding car that’s at risk of veering off the highway. The task for him now, just as it was for Gaston then, is to ensure a built-to-win club remains on course and accelerates into the playoffs. At 14-8 so far, Schneider’s helped steer the Blue Jays back on the road, but the finish line is still a long way off and a steady hand is needed.

“This is so much about the players,” Schneider says of what he most enjoys about managing. “Our job as coaches is to just get them prepared and have all the information. The greatest joy is watching guys have fun, play well, win, celebrate a win. Watching them interact with one another, watching the coaches interact. Being around this group for so long, four years with the staff and most of the players, every day when you see it work is the best feeling.”

***

Even as a kid growing up in Lawrenceville, N.J., Schneider tried to think along with the manager when he watched baseball on TV, drawn to the bigger strategies inherent to the sport. Fittingly, he ended up behind the plate as a player, relishing the games within the game every catcher must play, the vision of the entire field. Undrafted out of high school, Schneider ended up at the University of Delware, where he logged 171 games over three seasons, earning first team All-Colonial Athletic Association and American Baseball Coaches Association All-East honours in 2002. That year, the Blue Jays selected him in the 13th round and he was the prototypical college player valued by the J.P. Ricciardi-era front office, carrying both a high on-base percentage (.387) and slugging percentage (.519).

Once he signed, Schneider remembers the organization stressing the importance of on-base percentage over batting average, that the fewer outs a player made the more valuable he was, along with other principles that changed the game in those Moneyball days. Such thinking resonated with him and in 311 minor-league games across those six years, he had an on-base percentage of .340, compared to a batting average of .206, while slugging .336, rolling up and down the system almost annually.

Advertisement

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-159503” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-159503” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: true,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310083881112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/6310083881112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/springer-borderline-crazy-schneider-brings-blue-jays-new-manager/”
});
});

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-120539” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310083881112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

Advertisement

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

Advertisement

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-120539” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: false,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310083881112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/6310083881112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/springer-borderline-crazy-schneider-brings-blue-jays-new-manager/”
});
});

.acf-block-preview .br-video-thumbnail::before {
content: “”;
position: absolute;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-moz-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-ms-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-o-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
width: 20px;
height: 24px;
border-top: 14px solid transparent;
border-left: 22px solid #fff;
border-bottom: 14px solid transparent;
margin-left: 3px;
}

Interspersed through that time were six documented concussions, all off foul tips that struck him on the mask. Those followed a more severe incident in 2001 while he was playing in the Cape Cod League, when a backswing shattered his helmet. Add in the 2006 surgery to correct a herniated disc in his back, it’s understandable why Schneider was already weighing his options when he got to spring training in 2008. “It took a lot of prep work to just get ready to play three times a week, know what I mean?” he says.

The physical toll Schneider had endured and the leadership qualities he’d displayed on his various teams both caught the eye of Scott, who as a matter of course sought to identify potential future coaches among players who weren’t on a fast-track to the big-leagues. In Schneider, he saw “a hard-nosed guy who always had a sense of humour,” says Scott, now co-ordinator of coaching development and instruction for the New York Mets. “And when guys are likable and they’re good baseball guys and they care, plus being a former catcher, it’s like this guy could be a good coach in our organization. As it turned out, he was.”

Scott also valued hiring players from within the system because they understood organizational priorities and were more invested in them. Schneider checked all the boxes, which is why he broached the idea that fateful spring, leading to a choice. He could kick around for a couple more years and see where it took him. Or he could get a head start on a different career path. “It keeps you in the game,” Schneider says of the transition. “I always said, if I wasn’t going to be a coach, I would be a teacher. I don’t know why, but I like sharing experiences. I like getting to know people. Baseball is what I know best, so it’s easy to talk to guys about anything that the game has to offer.”

Those qualities helped him learn on the fly, which helped because he didn’t jump into coaching with preconceived ideas about philosophies and approaches. Mostly, he trusted his instinct, the way he builds relationships with an added a dose of cautionary tales he’d seen. A prime example? “Not being connected to your teammates. Not being connected to your staff,” he replies. An important early piece of advice he adhered to was, “try to spend one minute a day with each person. I literally tried to just talk to people, whether it was during BP, clubhouse, whatever.”

Advertisement

That part came easy to him. As a catcher he was the same way. “Social butterfly,” Schneider says with a grin. “It’s easier when people trust you. Like when pitchers trusted what I was calling, it just made it easier. And that comes through conversations, not just game experiences. With relationships comes trust.”

Among his initial coaching influences were Dwayne Murphy, Ernie Whitt and Scott, who’d regularly visit with Schneider to dissect various decisions, kick around different approaches and generally offer support. Scott liked his work as hitting coach with the GCL Blue Jays so much that the next year he made him the club’s manager. Another promotion, this time to short-season A Vancouver, came in 2011, after Scott had left the Blue Jays when Alex Anthopolous replaced Ricciardi as GM.

“John probably wouldn’t like me saying this, but he’s probably a better coach than he was player,” says Scott. “He wasn’t a bad player. But sometimes guys, their makeup is just suited for leading and coaching other guys. That’s really something that he showed.”

***

After a leave of absence in August 2011 so he could tend to a personal matter, Schneider resumed managing in 2013 with GCL Blue Jays, returning to the Canadians in 2014-15 and then jumping to low-A Lansing in 2016. It was during this period he began to find a better balance between being demanding instead of too hard on his players, while learning to manage with a bigger picture in mind. Some of the philosophies he employs now, particularly being aggressive on the bases, started taking hold then, too. “I remembered how hard baseball was and I always found it easier to not wait around for a big play to happen,” says Schneider. “If you can kind of dictate the momentum of the game or the pace of the game, it’s just easier that way. Baserunning is a big part of it. Putting the ball in play is a big part of it. And just trying to take advantage of mistakes.”

Advertisement

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-812088” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-812088” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: true,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310644763112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310644763112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/schneider-still-hope-kikuchi-can-pitch-meaningful-innings-september/”
});
});

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-879673” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644763112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

Advertisement

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

Advertisement

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-879673” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: false,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310644763112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310644763112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/schneider-still-hope-kikuchi-can-pitch-meaningful-innings-september/”
});
});

.acf-block-preview .br-video-thumbnail::before {
content: “”;
position: absolute;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-moz-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-ms-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-o-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
width: 20px;
height: 24px;
border-top: 14px solid transparent;
border-left: 22px solid #fff;
border-bottom: 14px solid transparent;
margin-left: 3px;
}

By 2017, when he was promoted to high-A Dunedin, Schneider’s star really started to rise as he was handed many of the organization’s most important prospects. That season alone, he managed Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Bo Bichette, Cavan Biggio, Lourdes Gurriel Jr., Danny Jansen, Jordan Romano, Ryan Borucki and Tayler Saucedo, among other future big-leaguers, and led the club to a share of the Florida State League championship. The next year, with much of the same group at double-A New Hampshire plus Santiago Espinal, Jonathan Davis and Harold Ramirez, also ended with a title. “He did a good job of making us feel like a team,” says Bichette. “In the minor leagues, a lot of times it can feel pretty individual. He made sure that we remembered it’s important to be a good teammate, important to come on the field every day to win. Yeah, we had talent, but I think he definitely had a big part in us winning.”

None of that was by accident. Typically the focus in the minor leagues is on development. At times the way players are used and how they perform is based on growth priorities and organizational restrictions. Winning can become a happy by-product as opposed to the sole goal. But Schneider refused to let one come at the expense of the other because “I thought I’d be doing them and the organization a disservice if they didn’t appreciate winning, knowing how to celebrate a win, knowing how to learn from a loss,” he says. “In between, yeah, you want to get better, you want to improve your skills. But really those years, especially in 2018, I thought it was really important to preach this is winning baseball. There’s practice time. There’s development time. And then at 7 p.m., it’s ‘Hey, we’re going to try to win.’”

As important as that was, similarly critical to Schneider’s path was the way he embraced the latest information revolution sweeping over the game at that time. The Blue Jays in those years were both diving into the new opportunities created by advances in on-field data collection and completely rebuilding the entire organization after president and CEO Mark Shapiro and GM Ross Atkins took over the club following the 2015 season. Gil Kim, hired as the club’s director, player development, “challenged me to do things differently, think openly,” says Schneider, and just like he had during the Ricciardi/Moneyball years, he embraced all the new info filtering down to him, from new practice drills to unorthodox pitch usages.

At times, Kim concedes, the Blue Jays identified development concepts they liked but were unsure of how to implement. Schneider would “brainstorm with his staff, brainstorm with other coaches, come up with his own tweaks on it. And then the biggest key is that he was very consistent with implementing a lot of the new ideas that were being introduced. He was also very consistent in coming up with his own ideas as well. And through that process, we were all able to learn what are the best ways to go forward.” Kim laughs when he thinks back to some of the things they threw against the wall. “You’re not always going to agree with everything you see, read or hear,” he says. “But listening, taking time to digest the information, trying it out and then drawing conclusions is very important and that’s how he handled it.”

Advertisement

Pivotal, too, is knowing what to change, and what to leave the same. The Holy Grail in baseball management is finding the right blend of traditional coaching/scouting and advanced methodologies. “When I was in minor-leagues with him, the game was still a little bit old school,” says Biggio. “Then probably about 2019, the game kind of changed, went more analytical and he learned that side of the game but ultimately maintained his feel, which is what made him such a great coach over the years.”

In a sense, then, that period of time turned out to be the perfect training ground for how the modern manager operates, buffering various inputs from the front office, fellow coaches, players and his own ideas in search of the best decision for a lineup, an approach, a pitching change, etc. Essentially, a manager must act as a translator to ensure the different parts of the organization understand what the other is saying, whether it’s why defensive shifts make sense, how to best leverage a pitching repertoire or what type of swing adjustment needs to be made. “It’s having the information and being able to answer why we’re doing it,” says Schneider. “Also it’s a credit to the players for understanding the information and being able to push back or ask questions, and never wanting to put them in spots where they’re uncomfortable. They know just about as much as we know. And then it’s coming together and saying, yeah, OK, this is important, to win we should do it. I think we do a good job of educating them on why we do certain things. It makes it a lot easier for us to have those conversations.”

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-462290” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-462290” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: true,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310645261112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310645261112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/schneider-not-seeing-difference-berrios-approach-road-home/”
});
});

Advertisement

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-610438” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310645261112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-610438” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: false,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310645261112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310645261112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/schneider-not-seeing-difference-berrios-approach-road-home/”
});
});

.acf-block-preview .br-video-thumbnail::before {
content: “”;
position: absolute;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-moz-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-ms-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-o-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
width: 20px;
height: 24px;
border-top: 14px solid transparent;
border-left: 22px solid #fff;
border-bottom: 14px solid transparent;
margin-left: 3px;
}

All of that progress led to speculation about Schneider as a candidate to become Blue Jays manager after John Gibbons parted ways with the club after the 2018 season. He wasn’t interviewed and the job eventually went to Charlie Montoyo, but Atkins and assistant GMs Joe Sheehan and Mike Murov did speak to him afterwards about a coaching position on the staff. They hired him initially as a major league coach but by last season he was the de facto bench coach, a title he officially took this year.

During that 2019 season, Schneider made a point of getting to know established big-leaguers like Justin Smoak and Clay Buchholz, plus guys he’d touched in the minors like Marcus Stroman and Aaron Sanchez, to understand how their mindset and needs changed in the majors. He tried to soak in all he could from Montoyo, pitching coach Pete Walker, third base coach Luis Rivera and Dave Hudgens, who this year moved from bench coach to hitting strategist.

Advertisement

That’s why when Atkins fired Montoyo last month, Schneider was ready to grab the wheel.

“I love this. This is what I do,” says Schneider. “The organization does a great job of giving you every piece of information you need. Being familiar with the staff is huge. Being familiar with the players is huge and having an idea of how they like to play. It’s not just like, ‘Hey, this is my style.’ You’re always evolving around your roster and the people you work with, both players and staff. So just being familiar with everyone has made it that much easier.”

***

After parting with Gibbons, the Blue Jays conducted an exhaustive search for his replacement. This is how Atkins at the time described the attributes they were looking for: “Tough, smart and passionate. Those are the overarching themes as I think about what it means to lead an environment in here to sustain championship-level expectations, understanding what it takes for communication to keep not just 25-man roster, but also the 40-man roster, the 200 minor-league players, the 100-plus scouts, the 100-plus coaches and medical staff people pulling in one direction and feeling connected. That person has to be an organizational leader and spokesperson, not just a leader of the 25-man clubhouse.”

Montoyo was Atkins’ first attempt at fulfilling that vision. How the Blue Jays fare the rest of the way will determine whether Schneider eventually has the interim tag removed to become the second. That will sort itself out in due course.

Advertisement

For now, Schneider is in charge and running things the way he always has. He tries to sleep seven hours, gets to the ballpark around noon for a 7 p.m. game, makes the rounds a couple of times, stopping to chat with everyone from the security guards at the clubhouse door to the chef in the kitchen to players as they arrive, holds a staff meeting at 2 p.m. and then gets into the day’s routine. He’ll throw batting practice and watch some video, seeking out a weakness or a tendency that can perhaps be exploited before running the game, where every decision he makes is subject to internal and external judgment.

A lot of the work happens during the pre-game staff meeting. Schneider is very organized, to the point “I’m almost OCD sometimes with certain things.” The group will try to plan for various scenarios, using all available information to identify ideal matchups and possible opportunities they can exploit and debate the merits of different plans. “Some of it is projection, some of it is percentages,” Schneider explains. “Doing things consistently and not shying away from saying this is how we’re going to do it, this is collectively how we feel we’re going to win and staying consistent with that is key.” There’s still room for instinct. “Totally,” he continues. “You’ve got to still use your eyes. You’ve got to feel out what this guy is doing that night, how has his work been? Where is he at mentally? There are so many numbers and pieces of information you have where it’s like you could just go by the book and there’s always a handful of decisions each game that you go, OK, this is what I feel is best, along with the staff, you’ve got to make it and live with it. Sometimes you’re right, sometimes you’re wrong.”

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-747394” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-747394” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: true,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310644768112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310644768112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/tapia-carved-vital-offensive-role-given-blue-jays-expected/”
});
});

Advertisement

var adServerUrl = “”;
var $el = $( “#video_container-412720” );
var permalink = $el.closest(‘.snet-single-article’).data(‘permalink’);

/*
if ( “1” == true && ‘undefined’ !== typeof window.getIndexAds ) {
var so = {preroll:{1:{1:{siteID:191888},2:{siteID:191889}}}};
adServerUrl = window.getIndexAds( ‘http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384’, so, permalink);
} else {
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384”;
}
*/
adServerUrl = “http://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×360&cust_params=domain%3Dsportsnet.ca&iu=%2F7326%2Fen.sportsnet.web%2FVideo&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=vast&unviewed_position_start=1&ad_rule=1&vid=6310644768112&cmsid=384”;
var adServerUrl_result = adServerUrl.includes(“cust_params”);
var queryString=”;
if(adServerUrl_result){
var gettheDUFI = localStorage.getItem(“theRED_loc”)

if(gettheDUFI){
queryString += “dufiid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
queryString += “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
var ppid = “ppid=” + gettheDUFI + ‘&’;
}

var DUFI_IP = sessionStorage.getItem(“DUFI_IP”)

if(DUFI_IP){
queryString += “dufiip=” + DUFI_IP + ‘&’;
}

Advertisement

adServerUrl = adServerUrl.replace(/cust_params=/, ppid + ‘cust_params=” + encodeURIComponent(queryString) );
}

$el.after( unescape(“%3Cscript src=”” + (document.location.protocol == “https:” ? “https://sb” : “http://b”) + “.scorecardresearch.com/beacon.js” %3E%3C/script%3E”) );

$( document ).one( “ready’, function() {
$( “#video_container-412720” ).SNPlayer( {
bc_account_id: “1704050871”,
bc_player_id: “JCdte3tMv”,
//autoplay: false,
//is_has_autoplay_switch: false,
bc_videos: 6310644768112,
is_has_continuous_play: “false”,
adserverurl: adServerUrl,
section: “”,
thumbnail: “https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://usasportnews.com/wp-content/webpc-passthru.php?src=https://www.sportsnet.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/6310644768112-1024×576.jpg&nocache=1&nocache=1”,
direct_url: “https://www.sportsnet.ca/mlb/video/tapia-carved-vital-offensive-role-given-blue-jays-expected/”
});
});

.acf-block-preview .br-video-thumbnail::before {
content: “”;
position: absolute;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-moz-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-ms-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-o-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
-webkit-transform: translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0);
width: 20px;
height: 24px;
border-top: 14px solid transparent;
border-left: 22px solid #fff;
border-bottom: 14px solid transparent;
margin-left: 3px;
}

And then there’s managing a group of 26 highly driven, uber competitive players who will have varying needs and desires at any given moment. A big part of what Schneider does when he’s making the rounds is taking the temperature in the clubhouse because “you’re never going to have perfect attendance — someone’s always going to be pissed off at you,” he says. “Someone’s always going through something and you kind of just try to stay ahead of it.”

To that end, he believes in “being brutally honest with players” but approaches difficult conversations with empathy “and always having their best interests in the forefront,” he adds. “It’s not being afraid to say, hey, that’s not up to standards, that’s not up to par, this needs to be better or, hey, man, way to be aggressive. Whatever it is. But that’s the delicate part. Being consistent in who you are. I’m not going to come in and bang tables and pound my chest and say I’m in charge. That’s not how I operate. But them understanding yeah, I want to have fun and be loose, but at the same time there’s definitely a standard we’re going to hold you to.”

Advertisement

That’s something Biggio has long appreciated about Schneider, whom he’s played for every year since appearing in nine games with Lansing in 2016. Especially now that he’s in a super utility role, the stream of communication about why he is or isn’t playing is especially important on a personal level, and it eliminates the guesswork on a collective level, too. “You want someone who has your back and sets you up for the best chance to succeed,” says Biggio. “And then one of the biggest parts is having poise. John embodies all three of those things really well.”

Dick Scott saw the ingredients for Schneider to provide all that way back in the day and now that his focus is on developing coaches, he still sees all the current elements a manager needs in him, too. “There’s a lot more to it than X’s and O’s. There are guys who are good managers that know the X’s and O’s and there are guys who communicate well. When you get a combination of that, you’ve got yourself a good guy,” explains Scott. “From the periphery the players seem to like the vibe in the clubhouse, and that’s so important. It’s really the vibe, guys comfortable being themselves, they can go play, no extra tension coming from the manager’s office. It’s effective, especially in this day and age. That’s what players want.”

For the time being, that seems to be what the Blue Jays have. “I just know how I’ve always done it and it just feels natural for me to do it that way,” says Schneider. “I’ve always said that great teams at the end of the year, they always say what a great group of guys, we loved coming to the field every day. I always try to keep that in the forefront and make sure that vibe is consistent, both with staff, players, support staff, everyone. That’s just how I operate.”

.acf-block-preview .br-related-links-wrapper {
display: grid;
grid-template-columns: repeat(2, 1fr);
gap: 20px;
}

.acf-block-preview .br-related-links-wrapper a {
pointer-events: none;
cursor: default;
text-decoration: none;
color: black;
}



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Ravens extend NFL record for consecutive preseason wins following Thursday’s victory over the Titans

Published

on


USA Today

The No. 21 is now synonymous with the longest winning streaks in NFL regular and preseason history. the 2003-04 Patriots won 21 consecutive games, an NFL record. On Thursday night, the Ravens won their 21st consecutive preseason game after securing a 23-10 decision against the Tennessee Titans

Baltimore has not lost a preseason game since 2016. Joe Flacco was their starting quarterback when the streak began, while Steve Smith Jr., who this past year was eligible for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for the first time, was heading into his final NFL season. Baltimore’s roster also included Terrell Suggs, who was entering his second-to-last season with the franchise. 

Along with not losing preseason games, another constant in Baltimore over the past six years has been kicker Justin Tucker, who is entering his 11th season with the Ravens. Tucker’s field goals of 47, 25 and 47 yards on Thursday night helped Baltimore pull out the win after falling behind midway through the second quarter. 

Advertisement

The Ravens won Thursday’s game by winning the turnover margin while holding the Titans to 1 of 3 red zone efficiency. One of those turnovers was scooped up by Kyle Hamilton, the Ravens’ first-round pick in this past year’s draft. 

Baltimore won despite the efforts of Malik Willis, the Titans’ rookie quarterback who overcame a slow start to score his first NFL touchdown, a 7-yard run early in the second quarter. Speaking of quarterbacks, the Ravens received a strong night from Tyler Huntley, who completed all but two of his 18 pass attempts that included his game-winning touchdown pass to Shemar Bridges



Source link

Advertisement

Continue Reading

Trending