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2022 Fantasy Football QB Rankings Update: Trey Lance, Russell Wilson move up in latest update

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In an ideal world, quarterback is the position that should have the least movement in Fantasy Football rankings during the preseason. Position battles matter at every position, obviously, but generally speaking, the stakes are pretty low at QB – does it really matter if Kenny Pickett or Mitchell Trubisky is the starter for the Steelers, or Baker Mayfield vs. Sam Darnold? Those guys are probably going to be bottom-12 options at the position no matter which one wins.

So there aren’t many notable movers in my latest update at QB. Tom Brady and Matthew Stafford moved down a bit – Brady is away from the team dealing with a personal issue, while Stafford is nursing an elbow injury – but neither was a big move. Joe Burrow and Russell Wilson moved up a bit, but that was mostly a consequence of Brady and Stafford moving below them. 

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I did decide to move Trey Lance up to QB12 this time around, to the top of the fourth tier at the position. Nothing I’ve seen in training camp reports or the preseason inspired the move, I just want to make sure I have a better chance of ending up with him on my teams, and I’d rather take the gamble on his skill set than bet on Aaron Rodgers elevating a bad receiving corps. Rodgers probably has the higher floor of the two, but a best-case scenario for both probably sees Lance finish as a top-three QB, and I’m not sure I trust Rodgers to have that kind of upside without Davante Adams.

I’ve also taken Deshaun Watson out of the rankings entirely pending the appeal of his suspension. It sounds like a settlement that costs Watson most of the season is a realistic outcome, and if not, a full-season suspension is very much possible. Seeing as the best-case scenario still sees him missing the first month and a half of the season, I just don’t think Watson is worth the trouble at this point. 

  1. Josh Allen* — If all you knew about Josh Allen was that he finished fourth in pass attempts and third in rush attempts among quarterbacks last year, you’d have a good case for him as the No. 1 option. The fact that he’s an efficient rusher who dominates near the goal line and an effective passer is what makes him the clear choice this season in a tier all his own. 
  2. Patrick Mahomes — Mahomes looked positively mortal for stretches last season and yet still finished with 4,839 passing yards and 37 touchdowns. That’s what a “down” year looks like. He doesn’t run quite as effectively as some of the other high-end QBs and he’s playing without Tyreek Hill for the first time, so many have him third at the position. I think anywhere from second to fourth makes sense, but I’ll defer to his elite track record and legitimate 50-touchdown upside. 
  3. Lamar Jackson — Jackson has stumbled a bit since his historic 2019 season, but he still has upside only a few other quarterbacks can touch. Justin Herbert might be a bit safer, but I don’t think he has 30-PPG upside; Jackson does. That’s enough to serve as a tiebreaker for me. 
  4. Justin Herbert* — There was no sign of a sophomore slump from Herbert, who actually improved both his yards per attempt and touchdown rate. The problem, such as it is, is that he probably doesn’t have the rushing upside the rest of the elite quarterbacks have. He makes up for that by being an elite passer, but when the margins between players are as slim as they are at the top of the position, that’s just enough to hold him back ever so slightly. 
  5. Kyler Murray — For the second season in a row, Murray looked like he was making a big leap before an injury slowed him down. In the first eight games of 2021, he was on pace for nearly 5,000 passing yards and 40-plus total touchdowns. An ankle injury cost him three games and he struggled upon his return. He’s one of those few QBs with 30-plus PPG upside, and I’m willing to bet on that and hope that injuries don’t slow him down again. 
  6. Jalen Hurts — Hurts’ rushing upside is second only to Jackson, so if the addition of A.J. Brown makes him a more effective passer, he could absolutely challenge for the No. 1 overall spot. 4,000 passing yards and 30 passing touchdowns plus upwards of 1,000 rushing yards is within the realm of possibility for Hurts if he takes a step forward. 
  7. Dak Prescott — There isn’t a new tier here, technically, but this is where we get to the more traditional pocket passer portion of the proceedings. Prescott is coming off a career high in touchdowns, but there is probably a perception, rightly or wrongly, that he was a little bit disappointing. A full year removed from that ankle surgery should do him well, but questions about the receiving talent in Dallas are probably holding him back a bit. 
  8. Joe Burrow — Burrow’s 8.9 yards per attempt and 6.5% touchdown rate from last year will be hard to repeat, but he’s another year removed from that torn ACL and should see an increase in passing volume to make up for whatever he loses in efficiency. I don’t love Burrow at his cost — he’s QB4 in NFC ADP at 59.5 — but that doesn’t mean I don’t like the player. I just wish he was a better bet to either run more or be in the top five in pass attempts. 
  9. Russell Wilson — Denver’s receiving corps is less proven than Seattle’s, but that might mostly because one group got to play with Wilson these past few years and the other didn’t. It says something about how high Wilson has set the bar that a season that saw him average 7.8 yards per attempt with a 6.3% touchdown rate is viewed as a disappointment. He’s one of the most efficient quarterbacks we’ve ever seen and should be in to at least challenge his career-high in pass attempts (558, set in 2020). He might be too low here. 
  10. Tom Brady — All Brady has done over the past two seasons is averaging 301.5 yards and 2.5 touchdowns per game, finishing as QB7 and QB2 in his two seasons in Tampa. He’s lost a lot of receiving talent from last year’s team — and he’s away from the team during camp, which is strange, if not exactly a reason to panic — but he’s likely to remain a high-end Fantasy QB, even in his age-45 season. 
  11. Matthew Stafford* — I dropped Stafford to the lower end of this tier due to concerns about his lingering elbow injury. Not that I think it’s likely to limit him much one of the regular season starts, or anything. It’s just that, the bar for a No. 1 QB is so high when you don’t run that any risk factor is going to get magnified. In all likelihood, you’ll be happy you have Stafford as your starting QB if you wait, but don’t let him be the reason you pass on a high-upside backup, either. 
  12. Trey Lance — Like, say, Trey Lance. Lance carries risk as a raw passer, but that is mitigated by a San Francisco offense that has made basically every QB look good over the past few years. He has elite weapons, a good system, and most importantly, game-breaking athletic abilities. I would prefer to pair Lance with a later-round passer with a high floor just in case he falters, but the overall package is so enticing, he could absolutely end up being one of the three best QBs in Fantasy this season. 
  13. Aaron Rodgers — Asking Rodgers to remain a must-start Fantasy QB with the worst WR group of his career is a tall task, especially in an offense that didn’t throw a ton with Davante Adams there. Rodgers is one of the best QBs we’ve ever seen, but it wouldn’t shock me if the Pakcers became even more run-heavy and we saw a dip in his productioin. In fact, I’m expecting it. 
  14. Kirk Cousins — There’s a lot of focus on what Cousins can’t do, or on his limitations, but the fact of the matter is, over the past three seasons, he’s put up a 6.2% touchdown rate and 7.9 yards per attempt — borderline elite numbers. The Vikings figure to modernize their offense, using 11 personnel as their base and increasing their throw rate, which could help push Cousins to another level. 5,000 yards and 40 touchdowns isn’t outside the realm of possibility here. 
  15. Derek Carr* — Carr could see a similar jump to Cousins thanks to the addition of Adams as his No. 1 receiver. Josh McDaniels figures to install an offensive system that puts Carr in position to take advantage of his weapons, and he’s already coming off a 4,800-yard season. The question will be whether the presence of a dominant red zone option like Adams can get Carr above a 5.5% touchdown rate for just the second time in his career. 
  16. Justin Fields — Fields has similar skills to Lance but is just in a much worse situation. Darnell Mooney and Cole Kmet are his top options, and I’m not sure either would even start for the 49ers. If Fields is going to break out, it’ll be because Matt Eberflus does a better job taking advantage of his athleticism than Matt Nagy did — Eberflus was the passing game coordinator for the Packers last season, where they ran 139 run/pass option plays, compared to just 64 by the Bears a year ago. They’ll have to get creative to get the most out of this offense, but Fields has the skills to be a Fantasy difference maker if they can manage it. 
  17. Jameis Winston — Winston is dealing with a foot sprain in camp, so hopefully that isn’t going to limit him by the start of the season — it isn’t expected to. Winston was having a strange season before tearing his ACL, averaging 2.2 touchdowns with just 186 passing yards per game, as the Saints went with an ultra-conservative game plan that saw him attempted just 25.2 passes per game. The questions is whether that reflected a lack of faith in Winston or in the team’s weapons. With Michael Thomas, Chris Olave, and Jarvis Landry making up the top weapons now, I’m expecting a bit more aggression, and Winston has shown he can take advantage of good weapons in the past. 
  18. Tua Tagovailoa* — Tagovailoa hasn’t shown us much in two years in the NFL, but the Dolphins are certainly putting him in position to succeed after acquiring Tyreek Hill and hiring Mike McDaniel to implement a Kyle Shanahan-inspired offense. He’ll have to prove he can do more than just complete those layup RPO passes he leaned on so heavily last season, but Hill and Waddle gives him one of the most explosive receiving duos in the league. 
  19. Daniel Jones — Jones has some talent around him, so the hope is that new coach Brian Daboll puts this offense in better position than the Jason Garrett/Joe Judge combo has the past few seasons. Jones’ athleticism makes him a sneaky-good Fantasy option if he can just be competent as a passer; that’s just been more than he has been capable of so fa.r 
  20. Marcus Mariota — I’ve been higher on Mariota than the consensus all along, but I wonder if seeing him rush for a touchdown in the preseason might not get more people on my side. Mariota has been a better passer than you think — 7.5 yards per attempt for his career — and his rushing will probably be a pretty big part of Atlanta’s offense this season. I wouldn’t be surprised to see him get benched at some point to see what Desmond Ridder can do, but I think he’ll be a viable QB2 until that happens. 
  21. Trevor Lawrence — The Jaguars made a point of adding a ton of salary to try to help Lawrence out this offseason, and while I’m not convinced the players they added are necessarily difference makers, there’s no question he’s in a better position than he was a year ago. Lawrence has some skills as a rusher, so if he can take a (big) step forward as a passer, there could be top-12 upside here. 
  22. Mitch Trubisky — Trubisky and Jones might be the Spider-Man meme at this point in their careers, because you’re hoping they can just be good enough as passers to make an impact as rushers. Jones has used his legs more consistently throughout his career, so I’ll give him the edge, but they have similar outlooks — including that both are fighting for their futures this season. 
  23. Ryan Tannehill* — Despite being in a low-volume offense, Tannehill has been top-15 in points per game three seasons in a row. The loss of A.J. Brown hurts, but the combination of Robert Woods, Treylon Burks, and Austin Hooper might make this a better all-around group if Woods and Burks get up to speed quickly. He’s another guy whose rushing ability (seven touchdowns in consecutive seasons!) makes him a better Fantasy option than you think. 
  24. Matt Ryan — Ryan is the QB2 you settle for, because there probably isn’t much upside in the Colts offense. They don’t have great weapons in the receiving game and they probably won’t throw the ball very much, so you’re hoping for efficient, mistake-free football to carry you to 18-22 points most weeks. He won’t be a difference maker even in a rosy outcome, but Ryan should be good enough as a QB2 that you won’t hate the experience. 
  25. Carson Wentz
  26. Mac Jones
  27. Baker Mayfield
  28. Jared Goff
  29. Zach Wilson
  30. Davis Mills
  31. Drew Lock
  32. Jacoby Brissett*

*End of a tier



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Following Ti-Cats QB Dane Evans on a quest to honour Indigenous cultures – Sportsnet.ca

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LISTENING AND LEARNING

, Photography By Peter Power
LISTENING AND LEARNING
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Following Ti-Cats quarterback Dane Evans on a quest to honour Indigenous cultures and his heritage
Peter Power

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W
hat does one do after throwing five touchdowns to win a professional football game? Celebrate your accomplishment? Get some literal rest on your laurels?

If your Dane Evans, you get up early, jump in your truck and hit the road in a quest to learn and to grow.

Evans is of the Wichita and affiliated tribes, on his father Damon’s side. His great-grandmother, Doris Jean Lamar-McLemore, was the last fluent speaker of the Wichita language. She died eight years ago, at the age of 89, but the spirit of the tribe burns brightly and Evans remains a source of pride. Whenever he went away to college, his tribe in Anadarko, Okla. presented him with a feather, and at his grandmother’s powwow, he was given the crest he now wears around his neck.

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Earlier this month, leading up to today’s National Day of Truth and Reconciliation, I accompanied the Hamilton Tiger-Cats quarterback as he visited with members of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation and Six Nations communities scattered along the banks of the Grand River in a quest to honour his own Native American heritage.

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The tour wasn’t some one-off publicity stunt. Evans has been engaged in learning about and trying to help solve issues facing Indigenous communities for some time. He posts Instagram stories educating viewers about the original inhabitants of the land that he plays on in every CFL city, he wears his tribe’s crest on his cleats, he sells merchandise with proceeds going to Indigenous and Native American charities, he has partnered with his team and sponsors to bring Indigenous youth to games and mentor them, and has attended local powwows with his wife, Nikki.

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The smiles on everyone’s faces — not just Evans’ but also those we encountered — is what will really stay with me. That kind of happiness isn’t something you often see in mainstream depictions of Indigenous people, but the visible pleasure people took in sharing their culture was a reminder of its importance, and of how vital the need to make sure it isn’t erased.

Here is a sampling of our conversations and the best moments from the day.

SPORTSNET: Why is your Native heritage important to you?

DANE EVANS: My great-grandma is the one who was — it’s not called a residential school in the States, it’s actually called an Indian school. She was taken from her land and taken there, and they tried to tell her not to speak her language, but she actually prevailed through all that, and she continued to speak her language and when she passed away in 2016, she was the last fluent speaker of our language. That’s something that I’m always honoured to just be a part of the family and a part of the tribe for that. It’s been something that’s always been important to me. Now I have this platform. I just want to get it out there.

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Evans first met with Chief (Gimaa) Stacey LaForme, the elected Chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation, for a discussion of the history of residential schools in Canada and the treaty lands.

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CHIEF STACEY LAFORME: The Missisaugas of the Credit are part of the Missisauga nation. We’re about 2,600 people; the Mississauga Nation is about 10,000. The Mississaugas have treaty lands of 3.9 million acres in Southern Ontario. Treaties taken with the Mississaugas where we understood, “You’re going to share it with us,” but the Canadian perspective and, before that, the Crown and English perspective was, “No, you’re giving it up. This is ours.”

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SN: How important is it for you to continue to pass on the practices, culture and language so that it isn’t lost?

LAFORME: The history of the Mississaugas was to the point that not only did we lose most of our land, but we also lost our way. At one time when I was growing up, this was a world of alcohol abuse and violence. We lost most of our culture and practices, and so we begin to re-identify with who we were and come to understand who we are and make those connections. There is no one way. Everybody finds who they are through different methods. [Evans] did it through sports, right? Somebody else might do it through music or arts, and so there is no one way to find out who you are and where you belong. But language, culture really draw you together and reconnect you as a people.

SN: When we take time to reflect, to learn, what should we focus on?

LAFORME: “Reconciliation” is a word. Is it enough? I don’t know. We can use “reconciliation,” but the idea is we try to make things better. We try to put things back the way they were intended to be before we made all these foolish steps to try to think that everything should all be the same. What a boring world we’d live in if everything was the same.

We’re talking about, the uncovering of the children. That was a moment in time that I think slapped a lot of Canadians in the face and [they] said, “Whoa, I didn’t know this was going on.” There was no more time to deny or say, “this didn’t happen” or “that didn’t involve me.” These are our kids, all of ours. And that was a moment. I think that was a reality check for this country.

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Nikki Shawana, an artist and language teacher from the Odawa Nation, Eagle clan, taught Evans about Indigenous languages and performed honours songs.

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SN: How important is it to continue to teach Indigenous languages?

NIKKI SHAWANA: In our language is our whole worldview. So, it enriches us because it gives us, first of all, a sense of pride in who we are. It reminds us of our connection to the natural world and nature. So, if you are a speaker of our language, you don’t have to be taught to respect the environment or to respect the animals because those teachings are all within our language.

Even though I’m not a fluent speaker, I can pass on what I know. As long as I can teach the students the basics and get them excited about learning and get them inspired and motivated to continue their language journey, then I feel like I’ve done my part to help revitalize our language.

I’d like to teach you how to say “every child matters” in our language.

EVANS: I would be honoured.

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SHAWANA: So, it’s Kina binoojiinyag chi-piitendaagziwag. Kina means “all.” Binoojiinyag is “children.” So, binooji is a child and to make it plural you add –nyag. Chi-piitendaagziwag, “they are all important.”

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Kevin Sandy of Cayuga Nation, Wolf Clan, Six Nations of the Grand River and Director and CEO of the Iroquois Lacrosse Program, taught Evans the history of lacrosse.

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SPORTSNET: What is the history of lacrosse in your culture?

KEVIN SANDY: Well my culture’s Haudenosaunee. If I kind of change Haudenosaunee to English that would mean, “people of the long house” or “the ones who build the long houses,” because that’s where our people lived. In our way of life and our teachings, we had games that we played. This stick ball game that you see here that a lot of Canadians and Americans know as lacrosse, for us, it’s connected to who we are. It’s connected to everything that is purely spiritual about who we are as Haudenosaunee people.

When we’re playing at the long house, we’re also playing to honour those thunder beings. When I hear thunder, I love that sound, because I know it’s going to nourish Mother Earth. Right now, we’re at harvest time, but springtime is when we play our game. We play to honour those seven thunder beings.

EVANS: I know my tribe had a version of it, too. My grandma would tell me, she would always just call it the stickball game.

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SANDY: Oh yeah, that’s it, exactly, and that’s all it was.

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Cody Jamieson, a professional lacrosse player from the Turtle Clan at Grand River and first-overall pick in the 2010 National Lacrosse League Draft, taught Evans the keys to playing box lacrosse and the importance of it for his fellow Haudenosaunee people.

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SN: How important is Lacrosse modern day to Mohawk people?

JAMIESON: For all of our Haudenosaunee people, our Six Nations, its medicine, and it’s not in the sense of taking a pill because I’m sick. It’s a lot of other things. You know, we struggle with mental health, and I find being in a team function definitely helps that.

SN: I was struck reading the 94 Calls to Action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that five of them were directed to sport. How have you seen sports, specifically lacrosse, help change some of the systemic barriers for Indigenous people in this country?

JAMIESON: For me, personally, it’s helped tremendously. I don’t think I would’ve been able to say that I would have a post-secondary education if it wasn’t for Lacrosse.

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EVANS: Everything Cody’s saying about Lacrosse is like literally me with football. I went to the University of Tulsa, and I wouldn’t even been able to get into that school if it wasn’t for football. Much like Cody owes a lot to Lacrosse, I owe a ton to football. It’s just awesome to be passionate about sport like that, especially being Native kids.

JAMIESON: When there’s community support and family support, that’s what really makes a difference. And so, we always try to make sure that people feel supported.

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SN: When we talk about truth and reconciliation in this country, we talk about listening and learning. I’m an active learner. What was the biggest takeaway for you today?

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EVANS: I’m the exact same way. I’m very hands-on, very active. It’s one thing to read about it online or in a book, but when you get out here and you talk to the people that live out here and that are from here, it hits different. For me, I’m a sports guy, so it was amazing to see how sport is correlated to everyday life and how a game such as lacrosse can tie everything together bigger than sport. We might all be from different walks of life, right, but we’re all pulling towards the same thing.

Everybody knows what happened was bad and it’s not about just pushing it away anymore. It’s about learning about it and moving forward from it.

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Photo Credits

Peter Power/Sportsnet (12)

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Ole Miss vs. Kentucky prediction, odds: 2022 Week 5 college football picks, bets from proven computer model

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Two of the SEC’s best clash on Saturday when the seventh-ranked Kentucky Wildcats meet the No. 14 Ole Miss Rebels. The Wildcats (4-0), who won at Florida in Week 2 in their first road game, look to make it two in a row away from home. Kentucky defeated Northern Illinois 31-23 last week. The Rebels (4-0) have won big in two of their four games, posted a hard-fought 35-27 victory over Tulsa last week.

Kickoff from Vaught-Hemingway Stadium in Oxford, Miss., is set for noon ET. Ole Miss leads the all-time series 27-14-1, including a 7-2 edge in games played in Oxford. The Rebels are 7-point favorites in the latest Kentucky vs. Ole Miss odds from Caesars Sportsbook, while the over/under for total points scored is set at 54.5. Before making any Ole Miss vs. Kentucky picks, be sure to check out the college football predictions and betting advice from the SportsLine Projection Model.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,000 times. Over the past six-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of more than $3,100 for $100 players on its top-rated college football picks against the spread. Anyone who has followed it has seen huge returns.

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Now, the model has set its sights on Ole Miss vs. Kentucky and just locked in its picks and CFB predictions. You can visit SportsLine now to see the model’s picks. Here are the college football odds and betting lines for Kentucky vs. Ole Miss:

  • Kentucky vs. Ole Miss spread: Ole Miss -7
  • Kentucky vs. Ole Miss over-under: 54.5 points
  • Kentucky vs. Ole Miss money line: Kentucky +215, Ole Miss -267
  • UK: The Wildcats are 5-1-1 against the spread in their last seven games overall
  • MISS: The Rebels are 11-5-1 ATS vs. a team with a winning record
  • Kentucky vs. Ole Miss picks: See picks at SportsLine

Featured Game | Ole Miss Rebels vs. Kentucky Wildcats

Why Ole Miss can cover

The Rebels are outscoring their opposition 164-40 this season, partly due to the play of sophomore quarterback Jaxson Dart, a transfer from USC. Dart has completed 51 of 82 passes (62.2%) for 697 yards and five touchdowns. He has thrown two interceptions, but has a rating of 148.8. Dart has also rushed 29 times for 201 yards (6.9 average), including a long of 36 yards.

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Freshman running back Quinshon Judkins leads the team in rushing. He has carried 70 times for 429 yards (6.1 average) and five touchdowns, and also has two receptions for 23 yards. He has rushed for 100 or more yards twice this season, including a 140-yard and two-touchdown performance last week against Tulsa. He carried just 10 times against Central Arkansas but rushed for 104 yards in Week 2.

Why Kentucky can cover 

Despite that, the Rebels are not a lock to cover the Kentucky vs. Ole Miss spread. That’s because the Wildcats are led by senior quarterback Will Levis, who has compiled a 174.0 rating this season. Levis has completed 79 of 117 passes for 1,185 yards and 10 touchdowns. He has been picked off four times. Levis is third in the SEC in passing efficiency and passing touchdowns.

Leading Kentucky’s rushing attack thus far has been fifth-year senior running back Kavosiey Smoke. Smoke has carried 51 times for 263 yards (5.2 average) and one touchdown. He also has three receptions for 30 yards. He has played in 38 career games for the Wildcats, rushing for 1,569 yards. Last week, Smoke had 12 carries for 85 yards (7.1 average) against Northern Illinois. The Wildcats will also have running back Chris Rodriguez Jr. (suspension) back in the lineup. The senior ran for 1,379 yards and nine touchdowns last season. 

How to make Kentucky vs. Ole Miss picks

SportsLine’s model is leaning Under on the total, projecting 51 combined points. It has also generated an against the spread pick that cashes in well over 50% of simulations. You can only get the model’s pick at SportsLine

So who wins Ole Miss vs. Kentucky? And which side of the spread cashes in well over 50% of simulations? Visit SportsLine now to see which side of the spread to jump on, all from the advanced model that finished the past six-plus years up more than $3,100 on its FBS college football picks, and find out.

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Air Force vs. Navy prediction, odds, line: 2022 Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy picks by proven computer model

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The Air Force Falcons attempt to extend their winning streak in the all-time series to three games when they host the Navy Midshipmen on Saturday in the first leg of the battle for the 2022 Commander-In-Chief’s Trophy. Air Force (3-1), which hasn’t posted three straight wins against the Midshipmen since a six-game streak from 1997-2002, dominated the last two matchups, rolling to a 40-7 home win in 2020 before posting a 23-3 road triumph last season. Navy (1-2) has lost four straight matchups at Falcon Stadium since registering a 28-21 overtime victory in 2012.

Kickoff at Falcon Stadium in Colorado Springs, Col. is set for noon ET on CBS. The Falcons are 14-point favorites in the latest Air Force vs. Navy odds from Caesars Sportsbook, while the over/under for total points scored is 38. Saturday’s game can be seen live on CBS and streamed live on Paramount+ with their must-have Premium plan. 

Sign up now to get a 7-day free trial at Paramount+. A subscription also gives you access to other sports content including the UEFA Champions League and Europa League, NWSL, NFL on CBS and countless movies and shows. Get it all free for seven days when you sign up right here.

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And before making any Navy vs. Air Force picks, be sure to check out the college football predictions and betting advice from the SportsLine Projection Model.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,000 times. Over the past six-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of more than $3,100 for $100 players on its top-rated college football picks against the spread. Anyone who has followed the model has seen huge returns.

Now, the model has set its sights on Navy vs. Air Force and just revealed its picks and CFB predictions. You can visit SportsLine now to see the model’s picks. Here are the college football odds and betting lines for Air Force vs. Navy:

  • Air Force vs. Navy spread: Falcons -14
  • Air Force vs. Navy over/under: 38 points
  • Air Force vs. Navy money line: Falcons -600, Midshipmen +430
  • AF: The Falcons are 7-1 against the spread in their last eight games
  • NAVY: The Midshipmen are 7-1 ATS in their last eight contests against teams with winning records
  • Air Force vs. Navy picks: See picks at SportsLine
  • Air Force vs. Navy streaming: Paramount+

Featured Game | Air Force Falcons vs. Navy Midshipmen

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Why Air Force can cover

The Falcons are coming off a dominant 48-20 victory against Nevada last week in which they owned a 34-point lead after three quarters. The nation’s top-ranked ground attack did most of the damage against the Wolf Pack, racking up 461 of Air Force’s 541 yards of total offense on 75 carries. Brad Roberts led the way, rushing 20 times for 123 yards and three touchdowns.

It was the second three-TD effort in three games for the senior, who is third in the country with seven rushing scores and ninth with 465 yards. Roberts has rushed for at least 100 yards in 12 of his 21 contests with the Falcons, the third-most such performances in program history. Air Force is averaging a nation-best 412.3 rushing yards and scoring 37.8 points per game.

Why Navy can cover 

The Midshipmen could give the Falcons’ running backs a tough time as they possess the fifth-ranked rushing defense in the country (69 yards allowed per game). Navy is 20th in the nation in tackles for loss as it is averaging 7.3 per contest. Senior linebacker John Marshall is first on the team with 3.5 tackles for loss and also leads the unit with 28 overall tackles.

Navy has registered 10 sacks over its first four games after notching only 16 in 12 contests last season. Junior defensive end Jacob Busic tops the squad with three sacks after recording two in 2021 and Marshall, who had one in 21 games over his first two campaigns, has made two. The Midshipmen got in the win column for the first time this season last week, defeating East Carolina 23-20 in double overtime for their fourth victory in their last five contests away from home dating back to last year.

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How to make Navy vs. Air Force picks

SportsLine’s model is leaning Over on the total, projecting 52 combined points. It also says one side of the spread hits almost 70% of the time. You can only get the pick at SportsLine.

So who wins Air Force vs. Navy? And which side of the spread hits almost 70% of the time? Visit SportsLine now to see which side of the spread to back, all from the advanced model that is up more than $3,100 on its top-rated college football spread picks, and find out.



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